Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Family Medicine
  • Community Medicine
  • Primary Care
  • vulner

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • MS, Stanford University, Department of Health Research & Policy, Health Services Research (2014)
  • Fellowship, Stanford CHP/PCOR and VA Palo Alto HSR&D, Health Services Research (2014)
  • Residency:Oregon Health and Science UniversityOR
  • Medical Education:Harvard Medical School (2006) MA
  • Board Certification: Family Medicine, American Board of Family Medicine (2009)

Community and International Work


  • ImPACT: Intensive Management Patient Alligned Care Team, VA Palo Alto

    Topic

    Case Management of high cost, high need VA Patients

    Partnering Organization(s)

    VA Palo Alto

    Populations Served

    Medically Complex Veterans

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Staff at Ravenswood Family Health Clinc, Belle Haven Clinic

    Topic

    Family Medicine

    Populations Served

    East Palo Alto / East Menlo par

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Gestational Diabetes and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy Among Women Veterans Deployed in Service of Operations in Afghanistan and Iraq JOURNAL OF WOMENS HEALTH Katon, J., Mattocks, K., Zephyrin, L., Reiber, G., Yano, E. M., Callegari, L., Schwarz, E. B., Goulet, J., Shaw, J., Brandt, C., Haskell, S. 2014; 23 (10): 792-800
  • To Sling or Not To Sling at Time of Abdominal Sacrocolpopexy: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis JOURNAL OF UROLOGY Richardson, M. L., Elliott, C. S., Shaw, J. G., Comiter, C. V., Chen, B., Sokol, E. R. 2013; 190 (4): 1306-1312

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the cost-effectiveness of three strategies for use of a mid-urethral sling (MUS) to prevent occult stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in those undergoing abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC). METHODS: Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared cost-effectiveness over a 1 year post-operative time period of three treatment approaches: 1) ASC alone with deferred option for MUS; 2) ASC with universal concomitant MUS; and 3) preoperative urodynamic study (UDS) for selective MUS. Using published data, we modeled probabilities of SUI after ASC with or without MUS, the predictive value of UDS to detect occult SUI, and the likelihood of complications after MUS. Costs were derived from Medicare 2010 reimbursement rates. The main outcome modeled was incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) per quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained. In addition to base-case analysis, one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: In our model, universally performing MUS at the time of ASC was the most cost-effective approach, with an incremental cost per QALY gained of $2867 when compared to performing ASC alone. Preoperative UDS was more costly and less effective than universally performing intraoperative MUS. The cost-effectiveness of ASC + MUS was robust to sensitivity analysis, with a cost-effectiveness ratio consistently below $20,000 per QALY. CONCLUSIONS: Universal concomitant MUS is the most cost-effective prophylaxis strategy for occult SUI in women undergoing ASC. The use of pre-operative UDS to guide MUS placement at the time of ASC is not cost-effective.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.juro.2013.03.046

    View details for Web of Science ID 000325091700058

    View details for PubMedID 23524201

  • Mifepristone-Misoprostol Dosing Interval and Effect on Induction Abortion Times A Systematic Review OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Shaw, K. A., Topp, N. J., Shaw, J. G., Blumenthal, P. D. 2013; 121 (6): 1335-1347

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