Bio

Academic Appointments


Honors & Awards


  • Distinguished Faculty Award Winner: Distinguished Educator/Mentor, University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division (2013)

Professional Education


  • BSc, Princeton University, Biology (1992)
  • PhD, Stanford University, Biology (1998)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


My current research projects include a study of sleep among older Americans, a study of health and disability trajectories among active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, and a study of cortisol and obesity.

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Exploring entrustment: housestaff autonomy and patient readmission. American journal of medicine Martin, S. K., Farnan, J. M., Flores, A., Kurina, L. M., Meltzer, D. O., Arora, V. M. 2014; 127 (8): 791-797

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjmed.2014.04.013

    View details for PubMedID 24802021

  • Clinical prediction of musculoskeletal-related "medically not ready" for combat duty statuses among active duty U.S. army soldiers. Military medicine Nelson, D. A., Kurina, L. M. 2013; 178 (12): 1365-1372

    Abstract

    No evidence-based mechanism currently exists to inform U.S. Army clinicians of soldiers at risk of being found "Medically Not Ready" for combat duty. Historically, musculoskeletal conditions represent high-frequency medical problems among Army soldiers. We explored the feasibility of using centrally archived medical and administrative data on Army soldiers in the automated prediction of musculoskeletal-related Medically Not Ready soldiers who did not deploy. We examined 56,443 active duty U.S. Army soldiers who underwent precombat medical screening during March through December 2009 and in March 2010. Musculoskeletal problems were associated with 23.0% of nonreadiness cases in the study population. We used multivariable logistic regression in derivation cohorts to compute risk coefficients and cut points. We then applied these coefficients to covariates in validation cohorts, simulating predictions 2 to 3 months before their medical screenings. The analysis yielded c statistics ranging from 83 to 90%. The predictions identified 45 to 73% and 50 to 82% of the individual male and female outcome-positive soldiers, respectively, while obtaining 83 to 95% specificity. Our findings demonstrate the potential of Army data to create evidence-based estimates of nonreadiness risk. These methods could enable earlier patient referrals and improved management, and potentially reduce medically related nondeployment.

    View details for DOI 10.7205/MILMED-D-13-00182

    View details for PubMedID 24306021

  • Sleep duration and all-cause mortality: a critical review of measurement and associations ANNALS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY Kurina, L. M., McClintock, M. K., Chen, J., Waite, L. J., Thisted, R. A., Lauderdale, D. S. 2013; 23 (6): 361-370

    Abstract

    Variation in sleep duration has been linked with mortality risk. The purpose of this review is to provide an updated evaluation of the literature on sleep duration and mortality, including a critical examination of sleep duration measurement and an examination of correlates of self-reported sleep duration.We conducted a systematic search of studies reporting associations between sleep duration and all-cause mortality and extracted the sleep duration measure and the measure(s) of association.We identified 42 prospective studies of sleep duration and mortality drawing on 35 distinct study populations worldwide. Unlike previous reviews, we find that the published literature does not support a consistent finding of an association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality. Most studies have employed survey measures of sleep duration, which are not highly correlated with estimates based on physiologic measures.Despite a large body of literature, it is premature to conclude, as previous reviews have, that a robust, U-shaped association between sleep duration and mortality risk exists across populations. Careful attention must be paid to measurement, response bias, confounding, and reverse causation in the interpretation of associations between sleep duration and mortality.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.annepidem.2013.03.015

    View details for Web of Science ID 000319782700010

    View details for PubMedID 23622956

  • Loneliness Is Associated with Sleep Fragmentation in a Communal Society SLEEP Kurina, L. M., Knutson, K. L., Hawkley, L. C., Cacioppo, J. T., Lauderdale, D. S., Ober, C. 2011; 34 (11): 1519-1526

    Abstract

    Loneliness has been shown to predict poor health. One hypothesized mechanism is that lonely individuals do not sleep as well as individuals who feel more connected to others. Our goal was to test whether loneliness is associated with sleep fragmentation or sleep duration.Cross-sectional study.Members of a traditional, communal, agrarian society living in South Dakota.Ninety-five participants (mean age 39.8 years, 55% female) who were ≥ 19 years of age at the study's inception.Not applicable.We conducted interviews querying loneliness, depression, anxiety, and stress, as well as subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness. Study participants wore a wrist actigraph for one week to measure objective sleep properties; the two studied here were sleep fragmentation and sleep duration. Higher loneliness scores were associated with significantly higher levels of sleep fragmentation (β = 0.073, t = 2.55, P = 0.01), controlling for age, sex, body mass index, risk of sleep apnea, and negative affect (a factor comprising symptoms of depression and anxiety, and perceived stress). Loneliness was not associated with sleep duration or with either subjective sleep measure.Loneliness was a significant predictor of sleep fragmentation. Humans' social nature may partly be manifest through our dependence on feeling secure in our social environment to sleep well.

    View details for DOI 10.5665/sleep.1390

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296727200013

    View details for PubMedID 22043123

  • Sex-specific genetic architecture of asthma-associated quantitative trait loci in a founder population CURRENT ALLERGY AND ASTHMA REPORTS Ober, C., Pan, L., Phillips, N., Parry, R., Kurina, L. A. 2006; 6 (3): 241-246

    Abstract

    Identifying genes that influence susceptibility to asthma-related and atopy-related phenotypes has been challenging, owing to clinical heterogeneity and a complex underlying genetic architecture that includes both gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. In this article, we report the results of genome-wide linkage and association studies of eight asthma-associated quantitative traits in the Hutterites, a founder population of European descent. Our study revealed significant sex-specific genetic architecture for at least five of these traits, and identified 13 genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) by linkage or association that are present in only one of the sexes (nine in males, four in females).

    View details for Web of Science ID 000242004400009

    View details for PubMedID 16579875

  • Schizophrenia and cancer: an epidemiological study BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY Goldacre, M. J., Kurina, L. M., Wotton, C. J., Yeates, D., Seagroatt, V. 2005; 187: 334-338

    Abstract

    For decades there has been interest in the possibility that people with schizophrenia might have some protection against cancer, and that, if this were so, it might hold clues about aetiological mechanisms in schizophrenia.To study cancer incidence in schizophrenia.Cohort analysis of linked hospital and death records was used to compare cancer rates in people with schizophrenia with a reference cohort.We did not find a reduced risk for cancer overall (rate ratio 0.99,95% CI 0.90-1.08) or for most individual cancers. There was, however, a significantly low rate ratio for skin cancer (0.56,95% CI 0.36-0.83).We found no evidence that schizophrenia confers protection against cancer in general. Low rates of cancer are consistent with the hypothesis that sun exposure may influence the development of schizophrenia, although other explanations are also possible.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000232483500008

    View details for PubMedID 16199792

  • Sex differences in the genetic basis of morning serum cortisol levels: Genome-wide screen identifies two novel loci specific to women JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM Kurina, L. M., Weiss, L. A., Graves, S. W., Parry, R., Williams, G. H., Abney, M., Ober, C. 2005; 90 (8): 4747-4752

    Abstract

    Relatively little is known about the influence of specific genes on cortisol levels, particularly morning cortisol levels.The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci associated with morning serum cortisol levels.We carried out a genome screen for morning serum cortisol using linkage and association methods tailored for use in large pedigrees. We conducted these analyses both in the whole sample and partitioned by sex.This study was conducted on nine communal Hutterite farms in South Dakota.The Hutterites are a young founder population who practice a communal, farming lifestyle in the western United States and in Canada. Hutterites (n = 504, 53% female) aged 11-89 yr from a single pedigree participated in this study.The main outcome measures were markers significantly linked or associated with variation in morning serum cortisol levels.One genome-wide significant association was identified in the whole sample on 11p (D11S1981, P = 0.000092). Results of sex-partitioned analyses indicated that this association was restricted to females (females, P = 0.000084; males, P = 0.20). The 146-bp allele at this locus accounted for 7% of the variance in morning cortisol values in females, and females homozygous for the allele had an 89% increase in morning cortisol levels compared with female noncarriers. A second genome-wide significant association in females was identified on 14q (D14S74, P = 0.000091).Our results suggest that the genetic determinants of morning cortisol levels may be different for men and women and that loci on 11p and 14q influence morning cortisol levels in women.

    View details for DOI 10.1210/jc.2005-0384

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231068500048

    View details for PubMedID 15941864

  • The effect of menopause on grip and pinch strength: Results from the Chicago, Illinois, site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY Kurina, L. M., Gulati, M., Everson-Rose, S. A., Chung, P. J., Karavolos, K., COHEN, N. J., Kandula, N., Lukezic, R., Dugan, S. A., Sowers, M., Powell, L. H., Pickett, K. E. 2004; 160 (5): 484-491

    Abstract

    Women may experience a decline in physical function during menopause. Whether this decline is due to aging or to changes in hormonal status is unknown. The authors performed a longitudinal data analysis on data collected between 1996 and 2001 to determine the effects of menopausal status, age, race, and use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on 3-year changes in grip and pinch strength. Participants were 563 women from the Chicago, Illinois, site of the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. According to adjusted analyses, women who became postmenopausal showed a 1.04-kg decline in grip strength (p = 0.10) and a 0.57-kg decline in pinch strength (p = 0.002) relative to women who remained premenopausal. Women who became early perimenopausal showed a 0.20-kg decline in pinch strength (p = 0.04), whereas women who transitioned to late perimenopause showed a 0.93-kg decline in grip strength (p = 0.07). Effects of menopausal status on grip and pinch strength did not vary by race. A significant HRT-by-race interaction for grip strength was found; African-American HRT users had greater grip strength during the study, whereas Caucasian HRT users did not (p = 0.05). Greater physical activity was the strongest predictor of grip and pinch strength (p < 0.0001). Results indicate that transition through menopause is associated with a decline in grip and pinch strength.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/aje/kwh244

    View details for Web of Science ID 000223791900010

    View details for PubMedID 15321846

  • The social structure, stress, and women's health CLINICAL OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Williams, K., Kurina, L. M. 2002; 45 (4): 1099-1118

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179556900015

    View details for PubMedID 12438888

  • Appendicectomy, tonsillectomy, and inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control record linkage study JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH Kurina, L. M., Goldacre, M. J., Yeates, D., Seagroatt, V. 2002; 56 (7): 551-554

    Abstract

    To determine whether appendicectomy and tonsillectomy are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD); and, if so, whether the associations are related to age at operation.Nested case-control studies using a longitudinal database of linked hospital and death record abstracts.Southern England.Statistical records of people diagnosed with UC, CD, or a control condition admitted to hospitals in a defined area.Appendicectomy under the age of 20 years was associated with a significantly reduced subsequent risk of UC (relative risk =0.48, 95% confidence interval 0.30 to 0.73). The association appeared strongest for appendicectomy between 10 and 14 years of age (relative risk =0.29, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.68). Appendicectomy at the age of 20 years and over was associated with an increased subsequent risk of CD (relative risk =1.92, 95% CI 1.58 to 2.32), largely confined to those people whose CD was diagnosed within a year of appendicectomy. Appendicectomy under 20 years of age, undertaken five years or more before case or control conditions, was suggestively associated with a reduced risk of CD (relative risk =0.71, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.03). Prior tonsillectomy was not associated with any increase or decrease of risk of either UC or CD.Appendicectomy is associated with a reduced risk of UC; and the association is specific to young age groups when the population risk of appendicitis is itself highest. The increased risk of CD after appendicectomy, at short time intervals between the two, is probably attributable to the misdiagnosis of CD as appendicitis.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000176542100015

    View details for PubMedID 12080166

  • Abortion and breast cancer: a case-control record linkage study JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH Goldacre, M. J., Kurina, L. M., Seagroatt, V., Yeates, D. 2001; 55 (5): 336-337

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168138600014

    View details for PubMedID 11297654

Stanford Medicine Resources: