Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Medicine, Islamic Azad University (2010)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

Journal Articles


  • 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET/CT in Oncology: An Atlas of SUVs. Clinical nuclear medicine Sabbah, N., Jackson, T., Mosci, C., Jamali, M., Minamimoto, R., Quon, A., Mittra, E. S., Iagaru, A. 2015; 40 (4): e228-31

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the distribution of F Sodium Fluoride (F-NaF) uptake in the normal skeleton, benign and malignant bone lesions, and extraskeletal tissues, using semiquantitative SUV measurements.We retrospectively analyzed data from 129 patients who had F-NaF PET/CT at our institution for an oncological diagnosis between 2007 and 2014. There were 99 men and 30 women, 19 to 90 years old (mean [SD], 61.5 [15.5]). The range, average, and SD of SUV were measured for normal bone and extraskeletal tissues uptake for the entire patient population. A separate statistical analysis was performed to compare group A, which corresponds to the population of patient with no F-NaF-avid metastatic lesions, and group B, which corresponds to the population of patient with F-NaF-avid metastatic lesions. We also measured SUVmax and SUVmean for bony metastases and degenerative changesThe PET/CT images were acquired at 30 to 169 minutes (mean [SD], 76.5 [22.8]) after injection of 3.9 to 13.6 mCi (mean [SD], 7.3 [2.4]) of F-NaF. The range and mean (SD) of SUVmax for F-NaF-avid metastasis were 4.5 to 103.3 and 25.9 (16.6) and for F-NaF-avid degenerative changes were 3.3 to 52.1 and 16.5 (7.9), respectively.Various skeletal sites have different normal SUVs. Skeletal metastases have different SUVs when compared with benign findings such as degenerative changes.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/RLU.0000000000000633

    View details for PubMedID 25546225

  • Simultaneous Whole-Body Time-of-Flight F-18-FDG PET/MRI A Pilot Study Comparing SUVmax With PET/CT and Assessment of MR Image Quality CLINICAL NUCLEAR MEDICINE Iagaru, A., Mittra, E., Minamimoto, R., Jamali, M., Levin, C., Quon, A., Gold, G., Herfkens, R., Vasanawala, S., Gambhir, S. S., Zaharchuk, G. 2015; 14 (1): 1-8
  • Simultaneous Whole-Body Time-of-Flight 18F-FDG PET/MRI: A Pilot Study Comparing SUVmax With PET/CT and Assessment of MR Image Quality. Clinical nuclear medicine Iagaru, A., Mittra, E., Minamimoto, R., Jamali, M., Levin, C., Quon, A., Gold, G., Herfkens, R., Vasanawala, S., Gambhir, S. S., Zaharchuk, G. 2015; 40 (1): 1-8

    Abstract

    The recent introduction of hybrid PET/MRI scanners in clinical practice has shown promising initial results for several clinical scenarios. However, the first generation of combined PET/MRI lacks time-of-flight (TOF) technology. Here we report the results of the first patients to be scanned on a completely novel fully integrated PET/MRI scanner with TOF.We analyzed data from patients who underwent a clinically indicated F FDG PET/CT, followed by PET/MRI. Maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were measured from F FDG PET/MRI and F FDG PET/CT for lesions, cerebellum, salivary glands, lungs, aortic arch, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, and fat. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed the MR data for image quality.Thirty-six patients (19 men, 17 women, mean [±standard deviation] age of 61 ± 14 years [range: 27-86 years]) with a total of 69 discrete lesions met the inclusion criteria. PET/CT images were acquired at a mean (±standard deviation) of 74 ± 14 minutes (range: 49-100 minutes) after injection of 10 ± 1 mCi (range: 8-12 mCi) of F FDG. PET/MRI scans started at 161 ± 29 minutes (range: 117 - 286 minutes) after the F FDG injection. All lesions identified on PET from PET/CT were also seen on PET from PET/MRI. The mean SUVmax values were higher from PET/MRI than PET/CT for all lesions. No degradation of MR image quality was observed.The data obtained so far using this investigational PET/MR system have shown that the TOF PET system is capable of excellent performance during simultaneous PET/MR with routine pulse sequences. MR imaging was not compromised. Comparison of the PET images from PET/CT and PET/MRI show no loss of image quality for the latter. These results support further investigation of this novel fully integrated TOF PET/MRI instrument.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/RLU.0000000000000611

    View details for PubMedID 25489952

  • Circulating Tumor Microemboli Diagnostics for Patients with Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY Carlsson, A., Nair, V. S., Luttgen, M. S., Keu, K. V., Horng, G., Vasanawala, M., Kolatkar, A., Jamali, M., Iagaru, A. H., Kuschner, W., Loo, B. W., Shrager, J. B., Bethel, K., Hoh, C. K., Bazhenova, L., Nieva, J., Kuhn, P., Gambhir, S. S. 2014; 9 (8): 1111-1119

    Abstract

    Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) are potentially important cancer biomarkers, but using them for cancer detection in early-stage disease has been assay limited. We examined CTM test performance using a sensitive detection platform to identify stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing imaging evaluation.First, we prospectively enrolled patients during 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging evaluation for lung cancer that underwent routine phlebotomy where CTM and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were identified in blood using nuclear (DAPI), cytokeratin (CK), and CD45 immune-fluorescent antibodies followed by morphologic identification. Second, CTM and CTC data were integrated with patient (age, gender, smoking, and cancer history) and imaging (tumor diameter, location in lung, and maximum standard uptake value [SUVmax]) data to develop and test multiple logistic regression models using a case-control design in a training and test cohort followed by cross-validation in the entire group.We examined 104 patients with NSCLC, and the subgroup of 80 with stage I disease, and compared them to 25 patients with benign disease. Clinical and imaging data alone were moderately discriminating for all comers (Area under the Curve [AUC] = 0.77) and by stage I disease only (AUC = 0.77). However, the presence of CTM combined with clinical and imaging data was significantly discriminating for diagnostic accuracy in all NSCLC patients (AUC = 0.88, p value = 0.001) and for stage I patients alone (AUC = 0.87, p value = 0.002).CTM may add utility for lung cancer diagnosis during imaging evaluation using a sensitive detection platform.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000340138700012

    View details for PubMedID 25157764

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