Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2009)
  • Residency:Children's Hospital of Oakland (2008) CA
  • Medical Education:Jefferson Medical College (2005) PA

Publications

All Publications


  • Modulation of mTOR Effector Phosphoproteins in Blood Basophils from Allergic Patients JOURNAL OF CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY Gernez, Y., Tirouvanziam, R., Reshamwala, N., Yu, G., Weldon, B. C., Galli, S. J., Herzenberg, L. A., Nadeau, K. C. 2012; 32 (3): 565-573

    Abstract

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway contributes to various immunoinflammatory processes. Yet, its potential involvement in basophil responses in allergy remains unclear. In this pilot study, we quantified two key mTOR effector phosphoproteins, the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (peIF4E) and S6 ribosomal protein (pS6rp), in blood basophils from nut allergy patients (NA, N?=?16) and healthy controls (HC, N?=?13). Without stimulation in vitro, basophil peIF4E levels were higher in NA than HC subjects (P?=?0.014). Stimulation with nut (offending) but not chicken / rice (non-offending) extract increased basophil peIF4E and pS6rp levels (+32%, P?=?0.018, and +98%, P?=?0.0026, respectively) in NA but not HC subjects, concomitant with increased surface levels of CD203c and CD63, both known to reflect basophil activation. Pre-treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreased pS6rp and CD203c responses in nut extract-stimulated basophils in NA subjects. Thus, basophil responses to offending allergens are associated with modulation of mTOR effector phosphoproteins.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10875-012-9651-x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305982100019

    View details for PubMedID 22350221

  • The Safety of Peanut Oral Immunotherapy in Peanut-Allergic Subjects in a Single-Center Trial INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF ALLERGY AND IMMUNOLOGY Yu, G. P., Weldon, B., Neale-May, S., Nadeau, K. C. 2012; 159 (2): 179-182

    Abstract

    Peanut allergy is the leading cause of food-related anaphylaxis, and accidental exposures are common. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been posited as a potential treatment.Patients aged 3-65 years with peanut-specific IgE ?7 kU/l and/or a positive skin prick test with a history of an allergic reaction to peanut were recruited to undergo an OIT protocol. All adverse reactions were recorded by research staff or patients in real time.Twenty-four patients received 6,662 doses. Symptoms were mostly mild (84%), and only 3 severe gastrointestinal reactions required the administration of epinephrine. Abdominal pain was the most common reaction, followed by oropharyngeal and lip pruritus. Respiratory symptoms were rare.In this trial of OIT in adults and children, most reactions were mild.

    View details for DOI 10.1159/000336391

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305801300011

    View details for PubMedID 22678151

  • Use of Specific IgE and Skin Prick Test to Determine Clinical Reaction Severity. British journal of medicine and medical research Ta, V., Weldon, B., Yu, G., Humblet, O., Neale-May, S., Nadeau, K. 2011; 1 (4): 410-429

    Abstract

    AIMS: To determine whether specific IgE and skin prick test correlate better in predicting reaction severity during a double-blinded placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) for egg, milk, and multiple tree nut allergens. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, August 2009 and ongoing. METHODOLOGY: We examined the reaction severity of twenty-four subjects to nine possible food allergens: milk, egg, almond, cashew, hazelnut, peanut, sesame, pecan and walnut. Specific IgE and SPT were performed before each DBPCFC. DBPCFC results were classified into mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3) reactions using a modified Bock's criteria. RESULTS: Twenty four subjects underwent a total of 80 DBPCFC. Eighty percent of all DBPCFCs resulted in a positive reaction. A majority, 71%, were classified as mild. No reactions occurred with a SPT of zero mm while three reactions occurred with a negative specific IgE. All reactions were reversible with medication. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that SPT and specific IgE levels are not associated with reaction severity (p<0.64 and 0.27, respectively). We also found that combining specific IgE and SPT improved specificity but did not help to achieve clinically useful sensitivity. For instance, an SPT > 5mm had a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 50%. Combining SPT > 5mm and IgE > 7 resulted in a reduced sensitivity of 64%. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis 70% (n=17) was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge 4% (n=2).

    View details for PubMedID 22993721