School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Jay Bhattacharya

    Jay Bhattacharya

    Professor of Medicine (Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research), Senior Fellow at SIEPR and, by courtesy, at the Freeman Spogli Institute and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy and of Economics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on the constraints that vulnerable populations face in making decisions that affect their health status, as well as the effects of government policies and programs designed to benefit vulnerable populations.

  • Margaret Brandeau

    Margaret Brandeau

    Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (PCOR)

    Bio Professor Brandeau is the Coleman F. Fung Professor in the School of Engineering and a Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy). Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has focused on HIV prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the spread of hepatitis B virus, and public health preparedness plans. She has served as Principal Investigator or Co-PI on a broad range of funded research projects.

    She is a Fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and Management Science (INFORMS) and a member of the Omega Rho International Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS she has received the President’s Award (recognizing important contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (for research excellence in health care management science), the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.

  • David Chan

    David Chan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (PCOR)

    Bio David Chan, MD, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine, an investigator at the Department of Veterans Affairs, and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Chan’s research focuses on explaining productivity variation within US health care. He is particularly interested in studying what drives physician behavior, including organizational features of workplace design, financial and social incentives, and the use of information. He is also interested in designing interventions to improve productivity in health care firms and to understand behavioral pathways through which this may take place. He is the recipient of the 2014 NIH Director’s High-Risk, High-Reward Early Independence Award to study the optimal balance of information in health information technology for patient care.

    Dr. Chan received master’s degrees in policy and economics from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall scholar. He holds a medical degree from UCLA and a PhD in economics from MIT. He trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and was an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, prior to coming to Palo Alto, where he currently is a hospitalist at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Palo Alto.

  • Alan M. Garber

    Alan M. Garber

    Henry J. Kaiser Jr. Professor and Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Topics in the health economics of aging; health, insurance; optimal screening intervals; cost-effectiveness of, coronary surgery in the elderly; health care financing and delivery, in the United States and Japan; coronary heart disease

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care & Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy

    Bio Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine, a Core Faculty Member at the Centers for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research, and a Faculty Affiliate of the Stanford Center on Longevity and Stanford Center for International Development. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Mary Kane Goldstein

    Mary Kane Goldstein

    Professor of Medicine (Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research) and, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Health services research in primary care and geriatrics: developing, implementing, and evaluating methods for clinical quality improvement. Current work includes applying health information technology to quality improvement through clinical decision support (CDS) integrated with electronic health records; encoding clinical knowledge into computable formats in automated knowledge bases; natural language processing of free text in electronic health records; analyzing multiple comorbidities

  • Douglas Owens

    Douglas Owens

    Henry J. Kaiser, Jr. Professor, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Health Research and Policy and of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research uses decision analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and meta-analysis to evaluate clinical and health policy problems.

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