School of Medicine


Showing 1-7 of 7 Results

  • Xinnan Wang

    Xinnan Wang

    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dynamics and function, and their implications in neurological disorders.

  • Max Wintermark

    Max Wintermark

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Stroke, cerebrovascular diseases, cardiovascular diseases, carotid arteries, coronary arteries
    Stroke diagnosis, stroke triage, stroke treatment
    Traumatic brain injury
    Traumatic brain injury diagnosis and prognosis
    Psychiatric disorders, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorders
    Epilepsy
    Movement disorders, including essential tremor and Parkinson’s tremor
    Brain tumors
    Image-guided clinical trials
    CT, multidetector-row CT, perfusion-CT, CT angiography
    MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, perfusion-weighted MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI
    Brain perfusion imaging techniques
    Functional imaging
    Post-processing techniques of medical images, signal and image processing
    3D visualization
    MR-guided focused ultrasound

  • Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Albert J. Wong, M.D.

    Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our goal is to define targets for cancer therapeutics by identifying alterations in signal transduction proteins. We first identified a naturally occurring mutant EGF receptor (EGFRvIII) and then delineated its unique signal transduction pathway. This work led to the identification of Gab1 followed by the discovery that JNK is constitutively active in tumors. We intiated using altered proteins as the target for vaccination, where an EGFRvIII based vaccine appears to be highly effective.

  • Yu-Wei Wu

    Yu-Wei Wu

    Postdoctoral Research fellow, Neurosurgery

    Bio I am interested in the neural circuits for motor control and how it is affected under the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Currently I focus on dissecting the role of the striatal spiny projection neurons on integrating information from other brain areas, which are highly altered in PD. By incorporating various tools and state-of-the-art approaches, such as two-photon imaging/uncaging, patch-clamp electrophysiology, optogenetic manipulation of neural circuit and computational simulation, I aim to provide a comprehensive view, in the neuronal circuitry level, of how motor control is achieved and what goes wrong during the pathophysiological changes in PD, so that potential new therapeutic targets will be discovered to help PD patients.

    My past training has quipped me with various research skills including:
    1.Brain slice electrophysiology for studying ion channel physiology and synaptic transmission.
    2.Two-photon calcium imaging for monitor subcellular neuronal activity in brain slices and in vivo.
    3.Optics and microscopy development.
    4.Computer programming for image processing, data analysis, and instrumental control.
    5.Optogenetic techniques for controlling targeted neuronal circuits with transgenic mice and AAV viral injection.
    6.Immunohistochemistry and biochemical essays.

    These skills enable me not only to design and perform bench works independently but also capable to have a working model and a big picture in mind. I have a solid background in biology and neurophysiology, and my broad research skills further facilitate collaboration with experts from multidisciplinary. In summary, I have demonstrated a record for successfully completing research projects, and my strong motivation and substantial research skills have prepared me well to achieve my goal.