School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Steven Adelsheim, MD

    Steven Adelsheim, MD

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Bio Steven Adelsheim, MD is a child/adolescent and adult psychiatrist who works to support community behavioral health partnerships locally, regionally, at the state level and nationally. He is the Director of the Stanford Center for Youth Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Adelsheim has partnered in developing statewide mental health policy and systems, including those focused on school mental health, telebehavioral health, tribal behavioral health programs, and suicide prevention. For many years Dr. Adelsheim has been developing and implementing early detection/intervention programs for young people in school-based and primary care settings, including programs for depression, anxiety, prodromal symptoms of psychosis, and first episodes of psychosis. Dr. Adelsheim is also involved in the implementation of integrated behavioral health care models in primary care settings as well as the use of media to decrease stigma surrounding mental health issues. He is currently leading the US effort to implement the headspace model of mental health early intervention for young people ages 12-25 based in Australia. Dr. Adelsheim also leads the national clinical network for early psychosis programs called PEPPNET.

  • Karl Deisseroth

    Karl Deisseroth

    D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and of Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research in Dr. Deisseroth's laboratory focuses on developing optical, molecular and cellular tools to observe, perturb, and re-engineer brain circuits. His laboratory is based in the James H. Clark Center at Stanford and has developed optogenetic and tissue engineering methods, employing techniques spanning electrophysiology, molecular biology, optics, neural activity imaging, animal behavior, and computational neural network modeling.

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The medical research community has long recognized that “good well-being is good science”. The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Michael Greicius, MD, MPH

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Greicius' research involves the use of functional MRI in conjunction with other imaging modalities to detect and characterize neural networks in healthy adults and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. The main research objective is to develop novel imaging biomarkers that will enhance the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, major depression, and schizophrenia.

  • Hadi Hosseini, Ph.D.

    Hadi Hosseini, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Administrative and Academic Special Programs)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Lynne C. Huffman

    Lynne C. Huffman

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research interests and activities include (1) shared decision-making in clinical care; (2) medical education research; (3) the early identification and treatment of behavioral problems, particularly in children with special health care needs; and (4) community-based mental health/educational program evaluation and outcomes measurement.

  • Helena Chmura Kraemer

    Helena Chmura Kraemer

    Professor of Biostatistics in Psychiatry, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the methodology pertinent to dealing with research problems where biological and behavioral interests meet. These interests have been applied not only in psychiatric research, but in those areas of Cardiology, Pediatrics and other fields of medicine in which behavioral research is becoming ever more salient.

  • Adolf Pfefferbaum

    Adolf Pfefferbaum

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development and application of magnetic resonance imaging approaches for in vivo studies of human and animal brain integrity in neurodegenerative conditions, including alcoholism, HIV infection, Alzheimer's disease, and normal aging