School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 49 Results

  • Mark Berry, MD

    Mark Berry, MD

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Thoracic Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Berry joined the Division of Thoracic Surgery at Stanford in August 2014. He came to Stanford from Duke University, where he had most recently served as Associate Professor. He received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine after receiving bachelors and masters degrees in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He completed his residency in Cardiothoracic Surgery at Duke University Medical Center after performing a residency in General Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. His Cardiothoracic Surgical training included a year dedicated to Minimally Invasive General Thoracic Surgery, a period that also included an American Association for Thoracic Surgery sponsored Traveling Fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Dr. Berry practices all aspects of thoracic surgery, including procedures for benign and malignant conditions of the lung, esophagus, and mediastinum. He has a particular interest in minimally invasive techniques, and has extensive experience in treating thoracic surgical conditions using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical (VATS), laparoscopic, robotic, endoscopic, and bronchoscopic approaches. He serves as the co-Director of the Stanford Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery Center (SMITS), and has both directed and taught in several minimally invasive thoracic surgery courses.

    Dr. Berry also has a Masters of Health Sciences in Clinical Research from Duke University. His clinical research activities mirror his clinical interests and activities in optimizing short-term and long-term outcomes of patients with thoracic surgical conditions. He has more than sixty peer-reviewed publications, most of which are related to both the use of minimally invasive thoracic surgical techniques as well as evaluating outcomes after treatment of thoracic malignancies. His clinical practice and his research both focus on choosing the most appropriate treatment and approach for patients based on the individual characteristics of the patient and their disease process.

  • Thomas Burdon

    Thomas Burdon

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests New technologies in the area of catheters, clamps, and, visualization devices for aid in cardiac surgery; distribution of, cardioplegia, both anterograde and retrograde as determined by, techniques in technetium pyro-phosphate scans; glucose insulin, potassium as an adjunct in cardiac surgery.

  • Michael D. Dake

    Michael D. Dake

    Thelma and Henry Doelger Professor of Cardiovascular Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Improved endovascular procedures and devices to treat aortic lesions, peripheral arterial disease and venous abnormalities. Focused interest in drug-eluting stents and balloons, endovascular stent-grafts, including branched aortic devices and techniques for the endovascular management of aortic dissection. Current clinical research projects include drug-eluting stents for superficial femoral arterial disease and multiple device trials to evaluate stent-grafts for the treatment of aortic lesions.

  • Vincent DeFilippi MD, FACS

    Vincent DeFilippi MD, FACS

    Clinical Professor, Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests minimally invasive mitral valve repairs, minimally invasive maze procedures, off-pump cabg, robotic heart surgery

  • James Fann

    James Fann

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiac surgery simulation, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, coronary artery bypass surgery, cardiac valve disease, thoracic aortic disease

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