School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 20 Results

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Function of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Dominique Bergmann

    Dominique Bergmann

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We use genetic, genomic and cell biological approaches to study cell fate acquisition, focusing on cases where cell fate is correlated with asymmetric cell division.

  • Helen M. Blau

    Helen M. Blau

    The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Professor and Director, Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prof. Helen Blau's research area is regenerative medicine with a focus on stem cells. Her research on nuclear reprogramming and demonstrating the plasticity of cell fate using cell fusion is well known and her laboratory has also pioneered the design of biomaterials to mimic the in vivo microenvironment and direct stem cell fate. Current findings are leading to more efficient iPS generation, cell based therapies by dedifferentiation a la newts, and discovery of novel molecules and therapies.

  • Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Michael F. Clarke, M.D.

    Karel H. and Avice N. Beekhuis Professor in Cancer Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Clarke maintains a laboratory focused on two areas of research: i) the control of self-renewal of normal stem cells and diseases such as cancer and hereditary diseases; and ii) the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells. His laboratory is investigating how perturbations of stem cell regulatory machinery contributes to human disease. In particular, the laboratory is investigating epigenetic regulators of self renewal, the process by which stem cells regenerate themselves.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Development and maintenance of alveolar epithelium; alveolar morphogenesis and repair; lung adenocarcinoma cell type of origin

  • Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Maximilian Diehn, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My laboratory focuses on two main areas: 1) cancer stem cell biology and 2) novel biomarkers for identifying the presence of malignant cells (diagnostic), predicting outcome (prognostic), and predicting response to therapy (predictive). Areas of study include cancers of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal system. Clinically I specialize in the treatment of lung cancer and applications of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and perform both prospective and retrospective clinical studies.

  • BrianĀ Feldman

    BrianĀ Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overall goal of our research is to understand on both a molecular and systemic level how hormones regulate stem cell fate decisions and the role these pathways play in both physiology and disease. We use molecular biology and in vivo models to elucidate mechanisms of regulating cell fate determination by the endocrine system. Understanding these processes has profound and broad implications for both science and health.

  • Margaret T. Fuller

    Margaret T. Fuller

    Reed-Hodgson Professor in Human Biology and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Regulation of stem cell division and self-renewal Cell type specific transcription machinery and regulation of cell differentiation Developmental regulation of cell cycle progression during male meiosis Molecular dissection of the mechanism of cytokinesis.

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the genetics of pancreatic islet cell differentiation using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. Our knowledge of genetic and cellular pathways governing islet formation has allowed us to use stem cell lines to produce islet replacements in vitro.

  • Michelle Monje

    Michelle Monje

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, of Pediatrics and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Monje Lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms of postnatal neurodevelopment. This includes microenvironmental influences on neural precursor cell fate choice in normal neurodevelopment and in disease states.

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