School of Medicine


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  • Vinod Menon

    Vinod Menon

    Rachel L. and Walter F. Nichols, MD, Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests EXPERIMENTAL, CLINICAL AND THEORETICAL SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

    Cognitive neuroscience; Systems neuroscience; Cognitive development; Psychiatric neuroscience; Functional brain imaging; Dynamical basis of brain function; Nonlinear dynamics of neural systems.

  • Mark Mercola, PhD

    Mark Mercola, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Bio Dr. Mercola is Professor of Medicine and Professor in the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He completed postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, was on the faculty in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School for 12 years, and later at the Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Institute and Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego before relocating to Stanford in 2015.

    Prof. Mercola is known for identifying many of the factors that are responsible for inducing and forming the heart, including the discovery that Wnt inhibition is a critical step in cardiogenesis that provided the conceptual basis and reagents for the large-scale production of cardiovascular tissues from pluripotent stem cells. He has collaborated with medicinal chemists, optical engineers and software developers to pioneer the use of patient iPSC-cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, safety pharmacology and drug development. His academic research is focused on developing and using quantitative assays of patient-specific cardiomyocyte function to discover druggable targets for preserving contractile function in heart failure and promoting regeneration following ischemic injury.

    He established drug screening and assay development at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, which operated as one of 4 large screening centers of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Libraries screening initiative and continues as one of the largest academic drug screening centers. He co-founded two companies, ChemRegen, Inc., a start-up dedicated to developing small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications, and EpikaBio, Inc., dedicated to developing a device for myocardial regeneration.

    Prof. Mercola received an NIH MERIT award for his work on heart formation, and authored over 120 papers. He holds numerous patents, including describing the invention of the first engineered dominant negative protein and small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications. He serves on multiple editorial and advisory boards, including Vala Sciences (San Diego), Stem Cell Theranostics (Palo Alto) and the Human Biomolecular Research Institute (San Diego). His laboratory is funded by the NIH, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the Fondation Leducq.

  • Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    Thomas Charles Merigan M.D.

    George E. and Lucy Becker Professor of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am now emeritus and only participate in university activities through advising my former trainees who have joined the faculty.

  • Jason D. Merker, MD, PhD

    Jason D. Merker, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr. Merker is a clinical laboratory-based physician who specializes in genetic disease testing for both heritable disease and cancer. He is board-certified in Molecular Genetic Pathology, Clinical Pathology, and Clinical Cytogenetics. Dr. Merker is Co-Director of the Stanford Medicine Clinical Genomics Service, a laboratory section within the Stanford Anatomic Pathology & Clinical Laboratories that uses genomic sequencing and other advanced methods to evaluate the cause of disease in patients with unexplained heritable disease. He also directs an active research group that focuses on two areas: 1) development of improved experimental and computational approaches related to the use of genomic sequencing and other “omics” assays for clinical care, and 2) identification and characterization of acquired and heritable genetic variants that are important for the development of hematologic disorders and other malignancies.