Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Ruprecht Karl Universitat Heidelberg (2010)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing NATURE IMMUNOLOGY Lee, M., Kiefel, H., LaJevic, M. D., Macauley, M. S., O'Hara, E., Pan, J., Paulson, J. C., Butcher, E. C. 2014; 15 (10): 982-U129

    View details for DOI 10.1038/ni.2983

    View details for Web of Science ID 000342564800014

  • Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing. Nature immunology Lee, M., Kiefel, H., LaJevic, M. D., Macauley, M. S., Kawashima, H., O'Hara, E., Pan, J., Paulson, J. C., Butcher, E. C. 2014; 15 (10): 982-995

    Abstract

    Lymphocytes are recruited from blood by high-endothelial venules (HEVs). We performed transcriptomic analyses and identified molecular signatures that distinguish HEVs from capillary endothelium and that define tissue-specific HEV specialization. Capillaries expressed gene programs for vascular development. HEV-expressed genes showed enrichment for genes encoding molecules involved in immunological defense and lymphocyte migration. We identify capillary and HEV markers and candidate mechanisms for regulated recruitment of lymphocytes, including a lymph node HEV-selective transmembrane mucin; transcriptional control of functionally specialized carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin; HEV expression of molecules for transendothelial migration; and metabolic programs for lipid mediators of lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. We also elucidate a carbohydrate-recognition pathway that targets B cells to intestinal lymphoid tissues, defining CD22 as a lectin-homing receptor for mucosal HEVs.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/ni.2983

    View details for PubMedID 25173345

  • L1CAM A major driver for tumor cell invasion and motility CELL ADHESION & MIGRATION Kiefel, H., Bondong, S., Hazin, J., Ridinger, J., Schirmer, U., Riedle, S., Altevogt, P. 2012; 6 (4): 374-384

    Abstract

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) plays a major role in the development of the nervous system and in the malignancy of human tumors. In terms of biological function, L1CAM comes along in two different flavors: (1) a static function as a cell adhesion molecule that acts as a glue between cells; (2) a motility promoting function that drives cell migration during neural development and supports metastasis of human cancers. Important factors that contribute to the switch in the functional mode of L1CAM are: (1) the cleavage from the cell surface by membrane proximal proteolysis and (2) the ability to change binding partners and engage in L1CAM-integrin binding. Recent studies have shown that the cleavage of L1CAM by metalloproteinases and the binding of L1CAM to integrins via its RGD-motif in the sixth Ig-domain activate signaling pathways distinct from the ones elicited by homophilic binding. Here we highlight important features of L1CAM proteolysis and the signaling of L1CAM via integrin engagement. The novel insights into L1CAM downstream signaling and its regulation during tumor progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) will lead to a better understanding of the dualistic role of L1CAM as a cell adhesion and/or motility promoting cell surface molecule.

    View details for DOI 10.4161/cam.20832

    View details for Web of Science ID 000309964600012

    View details for PubMedID 22796939