Education & Certifications

  • Bachelor of Science, University of California San Diego, Molecular Biology (2009)

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Research & Scholarship

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All Publications

  • Migration of cells in a social context PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Vedel, S., Tay, S., Johnston, D. M., Bruus, H., Quake, S. R. 2013; 110 (1): 129-134


    In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential for the basic processes of life, the influence of neighboring cells on the individual remains poorly understood. Previous work on isolated cells has observed a stereotypical migratory behavior characterized by short-time directional persistence with long-time random movement. We discovered a much richer dynamic in the social context, with significant variations in directionality, displacement, and speed, which are all modulated by local cell density. We developed a mathematical model based on the experimentally identified "cellular traffic rules" and basic physics that revealed that these emergent behaviors are caused by the interplay of single-cell properties and intercellular interactions, the latter being dominated by a pseudopod formation bias mediated by secreted chemicals and pseudopod collapse following collisions. The model demonstrates how aspects of complex biology can be explained by simple rules of physics and constitutes a rapid test bed for future studies of collective migration of individual cells.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1204291110

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313630300038

    View details for PubMedID 23251032

  • Single-cell dissection of transcriptional heterogeneity in human colon tumors NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY Dalerba, P., Kalisky, T., Sahoo, D., Rajendran, P. S., Rothenberg, M. E., Leyrat, A. A., Sim, S., Okamoto, J., Johnston, D. M., Qian, D., Zabala, M., Bueno, J., Neff, N. F., Wang, J., Shelton, A. A., Visser, B., Hisamori, S., Shimono, Y., Van De Wetering, M., Clevers, H., Clarke, M. F., Quake, S. R. 2011; 29 (12): 1120-U11


    Cancer is often viewed as a caricature of normal developmental processes, but the extent to which its cellular heterogeneity truly recapitulates multilineage differentiation processes of normal tissues remains unknown. Here we implement single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis to dissect the cellular composition of primary human normal colon and colon cancer epithelia. We show that human colon cancer tissues contain distinct cell populations whose transcriptional identities mirror those of the different cellular lineages of normal colon. By creating monoclonal tumor xenografts from injection of a single (n = 1) cell, we demonstrate that the transcriptional diversity of cancer tissues is largely explained by in vivo multilineage differentiation and not only by clonal genetic heterogeneity. Finally, we show that the different gene-expression programs linked to multilineage differentiation are strongly associated with patient survival. We develop two-gene classifier systems (KRT20 versus CA1, MS4A12, CD177, SLC26A3) that predict clinical outcomes with hazard ratios superior to those of pathological grade and comparable to those of microarray-derived multigene expression signatures.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/nbt.2038

    View details for Web of Science ID 000298038700023

    View details for PubMedID 22081019

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