Bio

Bio


Kate Shaw is a northern California native and completed college at UC Davis with a degree in Nutrition Science. She moved to San Diego where she worked in BioTech until matriculating to medical school at Albany Medical College in Albany NY, where she got her medical degree. She then undertook and completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at Oregon Health & Science University before coming back to California for a fellowship in Family Planning at Stanford. As a Clinical Assistant Professor she enjoys teaching residents and medical students and seeing patients in Gynecology clinic. She also performs gynecologic surgery and works on Labor & Delivery. Dr. Shaw serves as the Residency Program Director for the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford and serves as the Medical Director for Ambulatory Gynecology at Stanford.

Clinical Focus


  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Family Planning

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology

Administrative Appointments


  • Residency Program Director, Stanford University, Department of OB/Gyn (2016 - Present)
  • Director for Ambulatory Care for Gynecology, Stanford Blake Wilbur Clinics (2015 - Present)
  • Assistant Director Division of Family Planning Services and Research, Stanford Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2013 - Present)
  • Associate Residency Director, Stanford Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2013 - 2016)
  • Assistant Director for Ambulatory Care for Gynecology, Stanford Blake Wilbur Clinic (2013 - 2015)

Honors & Awards


  • Outstanding Faculty Professor in Gynecology, Stanford University Department of Ob/Gyn (2015)
  • Excellence in Teaching by a Clinical Fellow, Awarded by OB/GYN Residents (2013)
  • Intern Teaching Award, Second year resident elected by intern class for excellence in teaching (2009)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Arthur Gold Humanism Honor Society (2007 - 2007)
  • Member, Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society (2006 - 2006)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2015)
  • Fellowship:Stanford School of Medicine (2013) CA
  • Medical Education:Albany Medical Center (2007) NY
  • MS, Stanford, Epidemiology and Clinical Research (2013)
  • Residency:Oregon Health Science University (2011) OR

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Value of Mifepristone in Cervical Preparation Prior to Dilation and Evacuation 19-24 Weeks Not Recruiting

    A common practice for preparation for surgical abortion after 19 weeks gestation is the placement of multiple sets of osmostic dilators 1-2 days prior to the procedure. The investigators aim to study the addition of mifepristone as an adjunct to cervical dilation prior to abortion between 19-24 weeks gestation, and its potential to minimize the number of painful procedures and time in clinic (or away from work/home) that multiple sets of dilators can require. The investigators hypothesize that one set of dilators with mifepristone will result in similar procedure times and decreased "total" time as two sets of dilators.

    Stanford is currently not accepting patients for this trial.

    View full details

Teaching

2016-17 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Self-Administered Lidocaine Gel for Pain Control With First-Trimester Surgical Abortion: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Obstetrics and gynecology Conti, J. A., Lerma, K., Shaw, K. A., Blumenthal, P. D. 2016; 128 (2): 297-303

    Abstract

    To compare pain control at various time points during first-trimester surgical abortion using a patient-administered lidocaine gel compared with a traditional lidocaine paracervical block.We conducted a randomized controlled trial of women undergoing surgical abortion at less than 12 weeks of gestation in an outpatient setting. The primary outcome was pain at cervical dilation as measured on a 100-mm visual analog scale. A sample size of 142 participants was planned to detect a 15-mm or greater difference on the 100-mm visual analog scale with 90% power and a significance level of .025, adding 10% for participant dropout and protocol violations. Participants received either 12 mL of a 1% lidocaine paracervical block or 20 mL of a self-administered, 2% lidocaine gel 20-30 minutes before procedure initiation. Secondary outcomes included anticipated pain, baseline pain, pain with speculum and tenaculum placement, pain after suction aspiration, and pain 30-45 minutes postoperatively.From April to October 2015, a total of 142 women were enrolled (68 in the paracervical block group, 69 in the gel group, and five not analyzed as a result of participant withdrawal). Sociodemographic characteristics were similar between groups. The mean pain score with cervical dilation was 60 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] 54-66) in the paracervical block group and 64 mm (95% CI 59-69) in the gel group (P=.3). There was no significant difference between mean pain scores at any time points measured.Self-administration of lidocaine gel before first-trimester surgical abortion is noninferior to a traditional paracervical lidocaine block and should be considered as an alternative, noninvasive approach to pain control for first-trimester surgical abortion.ClinicalTrials.gov, https://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02447029.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000001532

    View details for PubMedID 27400015

  • Assessment of a simplified insertion technique for intrauterine devices INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGY & OBSTETRICS Christenson, K., Lerma, K., Shaw, K. A., Blumenthal, P. D. 2016; 134 (1): 29-32

    Abstract

    To explore a simplified technique for intrauterine device (IUD) insertion.The present prospective longitudinal study enrolled patients aged at least 18years presenting at the gynecology clinic of Stanford University for IUD insertion between June 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014. No pelvic examination or uterine sounding was performed prior to IUD insertion. Transvaginal ultrasonography was performed immediately after insertion and at 4-6weeks to confirm device placement. The primary outcome was successful IUD placement.The study enrolled 50 patients. IUD insertion was completed successfully without any cervical manipulation in 40 (80%) participants. Sounding was not needed for any procedures. A cervical dilator was required to locate the internal os for 10 (20%) patients. The mean distance between IUDs and the endometrial verge immediately following insertion was 2.9mm. IUD insertion was rated "difficult" by the physician performing the procedure in 3 (6%) patients. No perforations were recorded. IUD expulsion occurred in 3 (6%) patients; menorrhagia was the indication for IUD insertion in two of these patients.IUD insertion without prior pelvic examination and sounding was feasible; this technique could reduce the need for instrument use during insertion and, consequently, the pain associated with insertion.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijgo.2015.12.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000379558200007

    View details for PubMedID 27113419

  • Update on long-acting reversible methods CURRENT OPINION IN OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Conti, J., Shaw, K. 2015; 27 (6): 471-475
  • Immediate postpartum provision of long-acting reversible contraception CURRENT OPINION IN OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Goldthwaite, L. M., Shaw, K. A. 2015; 27 (6): 460-464
  • Adjunct mifepristone for cervical preparation prior to dilation and evacuation: a randomized trial CONTRACEPTION Shaw, K. A., Shaw, J. G., Hugin, M., Velasquez, G., Hopkins, F. W., Blumenthal, P. D. 2015; 91 (4): 313-319

    Abstract

    The objective was to investigate mifepristone as a potential adjunct to cervical preparation for surgical abortion after 19weeks of gestation, with the aim of improving procedure access, convenience and comfort.This is a site-stratified, block-randomized, noninferiority trial of 50 women undergoing surgical abortion between 19 and 23 6/7weeks of gestation randomized to receive either one set of osmotic dilators plus mifepristone the day prior to procedure (mifepristone group) or two sets of osmotic dilators (placed 18-24 h apart) in the 2 days prior to procedure (control group). All subjects received preprocedure misoprostol. Primary outcome was procedure time. Secondary outcomes included preoperative cervical dilation, ease of procedure, and side effects and pain experienced by subjects.Mean gestational age was similar between groups (20weeks); more nulliparous subjects were randomized to the mifepristone group (46% vs. 12%, p=.009). Mean procedure times were similar: mifepristone group 11:52 (SD 5:29) vs. control group 10:56 (SD 5:08); difference in means -56s, with confidence interval (95% CI -4:09 to +2:16) not exceeding the 5-min difference we a priori defined as clinically significant. Preprocedure cervical dilation did not differ and was >3cm for the majority of subjects in both groups. There was no difference (p=.6) in ease of procedure reported by providers. Preoperative (postmisoprostol) pain and postoperative pain levels were greater with mifepristone (p = 0.02 and p= 0.04 respectively). Overall subject experience was not different (p=0.80), with most reporting a "better than expected" experience.Mifepristone with one set of osmotic dilators and misoprostol did not result in longer procedure times or less cervical dilation than serial (two sets) of osmotic dilators and misoprostol, and has the potential to improve access to second trimester abortion without compromising safety.Use of mifepristone for cervical preparation before surgical abortion after 19weeks allows for fewer visits and fewer osmotic dilators without compromising cervical dilation or increasing procedure time.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.contraception.2014.11.014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000351190700009

  • In reply. Obstetrics and gynecology Shaw, J. G., Asch, S. M., Frayne, S. M., Phibbs, C. S., Kimerling, R., Shaw, K. A. 2015; 125 (4): 989-?

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000783

    View details for PubMedID 25798980

  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Risk of Spontaneous Preterm Birth OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Shaw, J. G., Asch, S. M., Kimerling, R., Frayne, S. M., Shaw, K. A., Phibbs, C. S. 2014; 124 (6): 1111-1119
  • Effect of a combined estrogen and progesterone oral contraceptive on circulating adipocytokines adiponectin, resistin and DLK-1 in normal and obese female rhesus monkeys CONTRACEPTION Shaw, K. A., Hennebold, J. D., Edelman, A. B. 2013; 88 (1): 177-182

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Hormonal contraception is the most common medication used by reproductive aged women but there is little understanding of the impact of hormonal contraception on obesity and metabolism. Adipokine levels (adiponectin, resistin) and markers of adipocyte development (DLK-1) are altered in obese animals and humans and are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. We sought to determine the effect of combined hormonal oral contraceptive pills (COCs) on circulating adiponectin, resistin and DLK-1 levels in obese and normal-weight rhesus macaque monkeys. METHODS: Serum adiponectin, resistin and DLK-1 levels in reproductive-age female rhesus macaques of normal (n = 5, mean = 5.76 kg) and inherently obese (n = 5, mean = 8.11 kg) weight were determined before, during and 2 months after cessation of 8 months of continuous treatment with COCs. RESULTS: The obese group alone showed a significant decrease (p<.01) in weight with COC use, which returned to baseline after COC cessation. Baseline adiponectin levels prior to COC treatment were lower in the obese group (p<.05). Adiponectin levels increased from baseline in both groups, but more so in the obese group (p<.05). Resistin levels were similar at baseline, with an increase in both groups following treatment. Circulating resistin remained elevated above baseline levels after COC cessation, particularly in the obese group (p<.05). While DLK-1 levels did not change significantly in either group, a trend for higher levels in obese animals was observed. CONCLUSIONS: COC use may alter metabolic processes via direct (resistin) or indirect (adiponectin) means, while unchanging DLK1 levels suggest they do not affect adipocyte development. COCs may directly increase resistin levels, as observed in both groups. As adiponectin is inversely related to adipocyte mass, increased levels in the obese group are likely attributed to weight loss.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.contraception.2012.10.029

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321086000029

    View details for PubMedID 23218850

  • Mifepristone-Misoprostol Dosing Interval and Effect on Induction Abortion Times A Systematic Review OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Shaw, K. A., Topp, N. J., Shaw, J. G., Blumenthal, P. D. 2013; 121 (6): 1335-1347
  • Obesity and oral contraceptives: A clinician's guide BEST PRACTICE & RESEARCH CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY & METABOLISM Shaw, K. A., Edelman, A. B. 2013; 27 (1): 55-65

    Abstract

    Obesity and unintended pregnancy are two of the major health epidemics we are currently facing worldwide. Patient education is a clinician's greatest tool in combating both epidemics but many clinicians may be uncomfortable with counselling and prescribing contraception for obese women. Overall, the prevention of unintended pregnancy in obese women far outweighs any risk associated with oral contraceptive use. This review aims to provide the clinician with a practical guide to the use of oral contraceptive pills in obese women.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.beem.2012.09.001

    View details for Web of Science ID 000315003700007

    View details for PubMedID 23384746

  • Obesity Epidemic: How to Make a Difference in a Busy OB/GYN Practice OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL SURVEY Shaw, K. A., Caughey, A. B., Edelman, A. B. 2012; 67 (6): 365-373

    Abstract

    At just one-third of the American population, those with a normal body mass index are now in the minority in the United States, whereas 68% are overweight or obese. The key to reducing the prevalence of obesity and improving the health of our population is, of course, screening and prevention. Screening (as simple as a weight and height) is effective, inexpensive, and already part of the routine vital signs taken at every visit. However, providers often avoid tackling the issue of weight due to a misperception that treatment is not effective, or from fear of causing offense or compromising rapport. However, clearly more harm is done by not discussing this important health issue. Cardiovascular disease remains the number 1 killer of women, and obesity is the leading modifiable risk factor. Beyond heart disease, obesity has implications for every visit type seen in the OB/GYN office, from contraception to pregnancy to abnormal bleeding to cancer. In addition, maternal obesity adversely affects future generations, making the impact of obesity a never-ending cycle. OB/GYNs are often the only physicians that reproductive-aged women see, and, thus, OB/GYNs have the opportunity to provide a potentially life-altering intervention. Effective treatment is available and includes lifestyle changes, behavioral counseling, medication, and bariatric surgery. Time is always a limitation in a busy practice but becoming more comfortable with how to approach patients, the language to use and tailoring counseling can save time increase impact.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/OGX.0b013e318259ee6a

    View details for Web of Science ID 000306740700017

    View details for PubMedID 22713163