Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Physician Lead for Quality Improvement in Neonatology, LPCH (2012 - 2015)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2010) CA
  • Board Certification: Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics (2012)
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2005)
  • Residency:University of Washington Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center (2005) WA
  • Internship:University of Washington Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center (2003) WA
  • Medical Education:University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (2002) PA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Nutrition & growth in premature infants; Quality improvement in the NICU

Projects


  • Neuro-Humoral Biomarkers for Neonatal Skin-to-Skin Contact: An Observational Study, Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Explorations Grant (June 2015 - June 2016)

    Collaboration with University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine to measure neurosteroid levels in infants to determine whether they are affected by skin-to-skin contact, thereby influencing neurodevelopment. Skin-to-skin contact between mother and child shortly after birth has been linked with improved infant growth, breastfeeding and attachment, and, for preterm infants, enhanced neurodevelopment. The biological basis for this in humans is unclear, however in horses, high levels of neuroactive steroids in newborn foals can induce abnormal behavior including a failure to breastfeed. We will track neurosteroid levels in human infants, both full-term and late preterm, some of whom receive routine skin-to-skin contact, to identify any associations between the two that could identify potential neurodevelopmental defects amenable to treatment with skin-to-skin contact.

    Location

    Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford

    Collaborators

    • Vinod Bhutani, Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
    • David Stevenson, The Harold K. Faber Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    For More Information:

Publications

All Publications


  • Inhaled Nitric Oxide Neonatology: Clinical Practice and Procedures McCallie, K., Van Meurs, K. edited by Stevenson, D., Cohen, R., Sunshine, P. McGraw-Hill Education. 2015; 1st ed.: 1125-1127
  • Feeding Protocols for VLBW Infants Neonatology: Clinical Practice and Procedures McCallie, K. edited by Stevenson, D., Cohen, R., Sunshine, P. McGraw-Hill Education. 2015; 1st ed.: 1017-1020
  • Feeding Premature Infants: Why, When, and What to Add to Human Milk JOURNAL OF PARENTERAL AND ENTERAL NUTRITION Cohen, R. S., McCallie, K. R. 2012; 36: 20S-24S
  • Neonatology Pediatrics for Medical Students Cohen, R., McCallie, K., Rhine, W. edited by Bernstein, D., Shelov, S. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2012; 3rd ed.: 223-250
  • Improved outcomes with a standardized feeding protocol for very low birth weight infants JOURNAL OF PERINATOLOGY McCallie, K. R., Lee, H. C., Mayer, O., Cohen, R. S., Hintz, S. R., Rhine, W. D. 2011; 31: S61-S67

    Abstract

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized enteral feeding protocol for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants on nutritional, clinical and growth outcomes.Retrospective analysis of VLBW cohorts 9 months before and after initiation of a standardized feeding protocol consisting of 6-8 days of trophic feedings, followed by an increase of 20?ml/kg/day. The primary outcome was days to reach full enteral feeds defined as 160?ml/kg/day. Secondary outcomes included rates of necrotizing enterocolitis and culture-proven sepsis, days of parenteral nutrition and growth end points.Data were analyzed on 147 VLBW infants who received enteral feedings, 83 before ('Before') and 64 subsequent to ('After') feeding protocol initiation. Extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants in the After group attained enteral volumes of 120?ml/kg/day (43.9 days Before vs 32.8 days After, P=0.02) and 160?ml/kg/day (48.5 days Before vs 35.8 days After, P=0.02) significantly faster and received significantly fewer days of parenteral nutrition (46.2 days Before vs 31.3 days After, P=0.01). Necrotizing enterocolitis decreased in the After group among VLBW (15/83, 18% Before vs 2/64, 3% After, P=0.005) and ELBW infants (11/31, 35% Before vs 2/26, 8% After, P=0.01). Late-onset sepsis decreased significantly in the After group (26/83, 31% Before vs 6/64, 9% After, P=0.001). Excluding those with weight <3rd percentile at birth, the proportion with weight <3rd percentile at discharge decreased significantly after protocol initiation (35% Before vs 17% After, P=0.03).These data suggest that implementation of a standardized feeding protocol for VLBW infants results in earlier successful enteral feeding without increased rates of major morbidities.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/jp.2010.185

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289236900010

    View details for PubMedID 21448207

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