Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, Keio University (2010)
  • Doctor of Medicine, Keio University (1999)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • MicroRNA-mediated regulation of differentiation and trans-differentiation in stem cells. Advanced drug delivery reviews Ong, S., Lee, W. H., Kodo, K., Wu, J. C. 2015; 88: 3-15

    Abstract

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key components of a broadly conserved post-transcriptional mechanism that controls gene expression by targeting mRNAs. miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes, including the growth and differentiation of stem cells as well as the regulation of both endogenous tissue repair that has critical implications in the development of regenerative medicine approaches. In this review, we first describe key features of miRNA biogenesis and their role in regulating self-renewal, and then discuss the involvement of miRNAs in the determination of cell fate decisions. We highlight the role of miRNAs in the emergent field of reprogramming and trans-differentiation of somatic cells that could further our understanding of miRNA biology and regenerative medicine applications. Finally, we describe potential techniques for proper delivery of miRNAs in target cells.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.addr.2015.04.004

    View details for PubMedID 25887992

  • HIF-1 reduces ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the heart by targeting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH Ong, S., Lee, W. H., Theodorou, L., Kodo, K., Lim, S. Y., Shukla, D. H., Briston, T., Kiriakidis, S., Ashcroft, M., Davidson, S. M., Maxwell, P. H., Yellon, D. M., Hausenloy, D. J. 2014; 104 (1): 24-36

    View details for DOI 10.1093/cvr/cvu172

    View details for Web of Science ID 000343317000005

  • Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying increased ischemic damage in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genetic polymorphism using a human induced pluripotent stem cell model system SCIENCE TRANSLATIONAL MEDICINE Ebert, A. D., Kodo, K., Liang, P., Wu, H., Huber, B. C., Riegler, J., Churko, J., Lee, J., de Almeida, P., Lan, F., Diecke, S., Burridge, P. W., Gold, J. D., Mochly-Rosen, D., Wu, J. C. 2014; 6 (255)
  • Cross Talk of Combined Gene and Cell Therapy in Ischemic Heart Disease Role of Exosomal MicroRNA Transfer CIRCULATION Ong, S., Lee, W. H., Huang, M., Dey, D., Kodo, K., Sanchez-Freire, V., Gold, J. D., Wu, J. C. 2014; 130 (11): S60-?
  • Modeling Inherited Cardiac Disorders - A Cell Is Worth a Thousand Genes CIRCULATION JOURNAL Sallam, K., Kodo, K., Wu, J. C. 2014; 78 (4): 784-794

    Abstract

    Advances in the understanding and treatment of cardiac disorders have been thwarted by the inability to study beating human cardiac cells in vitro. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) bypass this hurdle by enabling the creation of patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs). These cells provide a unique platform to study cardiac diseases in vitro, especially hereditary cardiac conditions. To date, iPSC-CMs have been used to successfully model arrhythmic disorders, showing excellent recapitulation of cardiac channel function and electrophysiologic features of long QT syndrome types 1, 2, 3, and 8, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Similarly, iPSC-CM models of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) have shown robust correlation of predicted morphologic, contractile, and electrical phenotypes. In addition, iPSC-CMs have shown some features of the respective phenotypes for arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C), LEOPARD syndrome, Pompe's disease, and Friedriech's ataxia. In this review, we examine the progress of utilizing iPSC-CMs as a model for cardiac conditions and analyze the potential for the platform in furthering the biology and treatment of cardiac disorders.  

    View details for DOI 10.1253/circj.CJ-14-0182

    View details for Web of Science ID 000333792900001

  • Costimulation-Adhesion Blockade Is Superior to Cyclosporine A and Prednisone Immunosuppressive Therapy for Preventing Rejection of Differentiated Human Embryonic Stem Cells Following Transplantation STEM CELLS Huber, B. C., Ransohoff, J. D., Ransohoff, K. J., Riegler, J., Ebert, A., Kodo, K., Gong, Y., Sanchez-Freire, V., Dey, D., Kooreman, N. G., Diecke, S., Zhang, W. Y., Odegaard, J., Hu, S., Gold, J. D., Robbins, R. C., Wu, J. C. 2013; 31 (11): 2354-2363

    Abstract

    Rationale: Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives are attractive candidates for therapeutic use. The engraftment and survival of hESC derivatives as xenografts or allografts require effective immunosuppression to prevent immune cell infiltration and graft destruction. Objective: To test the hypothesis that a short-course, dual-agent regimen of two costimulation-adhesion blockade agents can induce better engraftment of hESC derivatives compared to current immunosuppressive agents. Methods and Results: We transduced hESCs with a double fusion reporter gene construct expressing firefly luciferase (Fluc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein, and differentiated these cells to endothelial cells (hESC-ECs). Reporter gene expression enabled longitudinal assessment of cell engraftment by bioluminescence imaging. Costimulation-adhesion therapy resulted in superior hESC-EC and mouse EC engraftment compared to cyclosporine therapy in a hind limb model. Costimulation-adhesion therapy also promoted robust hESC-EC and hESC-derived cardiomyocyte survival in an ischemic myocardial injury model. Improved hESC-EC engraftment had a cardioprotective effect after myocardial injury, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Mechanistically, costimulation-adhesion therapy is associated with systemic and intragraft upregulation of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM3) and a reduced proinflammatory cytokine profile. Conclusions: Costimulation-adhesion therapy is a superior alternative to current clinical immunosuppressive strategies for preventing the post-transplant rejection of hESC derivatives. By extending the window for cellular engraftment, costimulation-adhesion therapy enhances functional preservation following ischemic injury. This regimen may function through a TIM3-dependent mechanism. Stem Cells 2013;31:2354-2363.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/stem.1501

    View details for Web of Science ID 000327025600007

Stanford Medicine Resources: