Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Dermatology
  • General Medical Dermatology
  • Procedural Dermatology

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Associate Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University (2010 - 2012)
  • Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University (2012 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, American Medical Women’s Association (1999 - 2003)
  • Member, American Medical Student Association (1999 - 2003)
  • Chapter President, American Medical Student Association (2000 - 2001)
  • Member, Women’s Dermatologic Society (2005 - Present)
  • Member, Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery (2006 - Present)
  • Member, Skin Cancer Foundation (2006 - Present)
  • Chief resident representative, GME Committee, Columbia University (2006 - 2007)
  • Member, American Academy of Dermatology (2007 - Present)
  • Member, Dermatology Foundation (2007 - Present)
  • Member, National Association of VA Dermatologists (2007 - Present)
  • Member, National VA Dermatology Committee for Digital Photography Initiative (2008 - Present)
  • Member, Same Site Surgery Committee, VA Healthcare system, VISN 21 (2011 - 2011)
  • Member, Surgical Operative and Invasive Procedures Committee, Palo Alto Healthcare System (2011 - Present)
  • Member, San Francisco Dermatological Society (2012 - Present)
  • Member, Association of Professors of Dermatology (2013 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology (2007)
  • Medical Education:Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (2003) NY
  • Chief Resident, Department of Dermatology, Columbia University/New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY (2007)
  • Residency:Columbia University/New York Presbyterian Hospital (2007) NY
  • Internship:Lenox Hill Hospital (2004) NY

Community and International Work


  • Faculty member, SUNSPORT (Stanford U Network for Sun Protection Outreach Research & Teamwork)

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Faculty sponsor, Stanford School of Medicine, Dermatology Interest Group

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Dermatologist Medical Volunteer, Stanford University Skin Cancer Screening

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Dermatologist Medical Volunteer, Women’s Dermatologic Society Skin Cancer Screening

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Medical Volunteer, FUNRURAL program, Guatemala City, Guatemala

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Surgical Operative and Invasive Procedures Committee, Palo Alto Healthcare System

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • Same Site Surgery Committee, VA Healthcare system, VISN 21

    Ongoing Project

    No

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

  • National VA Dermatology Committee for Digital Photography Initiative

    Location

    US

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    No

Teaching

2015-16 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Mycophenolate mofetil-induced oral ulcerations in solid organ transplant recipients: A report of 3 cases. JAAD case reports Salik, J., Tang, R., Nord, K., Schneiderman, P. I., Grossman, M. E. 2015; 1 (5): 261-263

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jdcr.2015.06.005

    View details for PubMedID 27051747

  • Chromhidrosis: a rare diagnosis requiring clinicopathologic correlation. American Journal of dermatopathology Wang, A., Wysong, A., Nord, K. M., Egbert, B. M., Kosek, J. 2014; 36 (10): 853-855

    Abstract

    : Chromhidrosis is a rare idiopathic disorder characterized by colored secretions most typically from the malar cheeks, axilla, or areolar regions. Histologically, chromhidrosis is notable for glandular structures with decapitation secretion indicating ectopic apocrine glands in the dermis, and the presence of lipofuscin pigments under ultraviolet fluorescence and in cytology smears. This case report describes a 26-year-old man who presented with a 2- to 3-year history of black-colored secretions on the bilateral malar cheeks, present on exertion or with squeezing of the cheeks. A 3-mm punch biopsy of the left cheek demonstrated histopathologic findings characteristic of chromhidrosis under hematoxylin and eosin staining and ultraviolet fluorescence. To our best knowledge, this is the second case report in the literature of an adult male being affected by chromhidrosis, and the first of an adult male with black-colored malar cheek secretions in chromhidrosis.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/DAD.0b013e3182871a17

    View details for PubMedID 23503318

  • Chromhidrosis: A Rare Diagnosis Requiring Clinicopathologic Correlation AMERICAN JOURNAL OF DERMATOPATHOLOGY Wang, A., Wysong, A., Nord, K. M., Egbert, B. M., Kosek, J. 2014; 36 (10): 853-855
  • Pedunculated scrotal nodule in an elderly male: a rare presentation of trichoblastoma. Cutis Navi, D., Egbert, B., Nord, K. M. 2014; 94 (2): E8-9

    View details for PubMedID 25184656

  • Pyoderma Gangrenosum-like Lesions in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency I Treated with Intravenous Immunoglobulin PEDIATRIC DERMATOLOGY Nord, K. M., Pappert, A. S., Grossman, M. E. 2011; 28 (2): 156-161

    Abstract

    A 31-year-old Caucasian male with leukocyte adhesion deficiency I and a 20-year history of recurrent, painful cutaneous ulcerations on the extremities presented with fatigue and worsening pain in both legs. He had experienced minimal improvement in his leg ulcers from treatment with systemic steroids, numerous courses of systemic antibiotics, and brief trials of infliximab and mycophenolate mofetil. He was treated with monthly intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. Upon completion of six courses of intravenous immunoglobulin his ulcerations had nearly healed for the first time in a decade.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1525-1470.2010.01123.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000290381900013

    View details for PubMedID 21366684

  • Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY Rogers, H. D., MacGregor, J. L., Nord, K. M., Tyring, S., Rady, P., Engler, D. E., Grossman, M. E. 2009; 60 (2): 315-320

    Abstract

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaad.2008.08.035

    View details for Web of Science ID 000262617700019

    View details for PubMedID 19150275

  • Glomus tumor masquerading for 22 years as osteoarthritis of the hip CUTIS Weiser, J. A., Nord, K. M., Grossman, M. E. 2008; 81 (4): 339-342

    Abstract

    Glomus tumors are rare benign mesenchymal neoplasms that account for less than 2% of soft tissue tumors. These neoplasms typically are small nodules less than 1 cm in diameter, associated with pain that is exacerbated by tactile stimulation and cold hypersensitivity. We present a case of a large glomus tumor of the left lateral hip associated with a long history of severe pain of the left hip interfering with ambulation. Chronic pain as a result of a subcutaneous glomus tumor is rare and frequently misdiagnosed. In the case reported, a solid glomus tumor presented with 22 years of unilateral hip pain attributed to posttraumatic degenerative joint disease. Excision of a 4 x 3-cm nodule resulted in complete resolution of tenderness and joint pain. Subcutaneous glomus tumors can have unusually large size and location and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic, atypical, or treatment-resistant joint pain.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000255232700008

    View details for PubMedID 18491482

  • Soft papules and nodules on the buttock. Archives of dermatology Pol-Rodriguez, M. M., Nord, K. M., Engler, D. E. 2007; 143 (12): 1583-1588

    View details for PubMedID 18087013

  • Multiple cutaneous infantile hemangiomas associated with hepatic angiosarcoma: Case report and review of the literature (vol 118, pg e907, 2007) PEDIATRICS Nord, K. M., Kandel, J., Lefkowitch, J. H. 2007; 119 (6): 1271-1271
  • Perioral dermatitis in a patient with myasthenia gravis following systemic corticosteroid treatment BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY Goss, J. M., Nord, K. M., Olarte, M. R., Grossman, M. E. 2007; 156 (3): 582-582
  • Repair of a conchal bowl defect extending through the conchal cartilage DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY Magnuson, K. A., Ratner, D. 2002; 28 (12): 1165-1167

    View details for Web of Science ID 000179751300014

    View details for PubMedID 12472499