Bio

Professional Education


  • Master of Science, Lunds Universitet (2006)
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Lunds Universitet (2012)
  • Diplom, Katedralskolan (2000)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • Actin polymerization-enhancing drugs promote ovarian follicle growth mediated by the Hippo signaling effector YAP FASEB JOURNAL Cheng, Y., Feng, Y., Jansson, L., Sato, Y., Deguchi, M., Kawamura, K., Hsueh, A. J. 2015; 29 (6): 2423-2430

    Abstract

    Hippo signaling pathway consists of conserved serine/threonine kinases to maintain optimal organ sizes. Studies have demonstrated that fragmentation of murine ovaries increases actin polymerization and disrupts Hippo signaling, leading to nuclear translocation of Hippo signaling effector Yes-associated protein (YAP) in ovarian follicles and follicle growth. For patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome showing follicle arrest, ovarian wedge resection and laser drilling promote follicle growth. Because these damaging procedures likely involve actin polymerization, we tested whether actin polymerization-promoting drugs could promote YAP translocation and stimulate follicle growth. Treatment of murine ovaries with μM Jasplakinolide (JASP), an actin polymerization-promoting cyclic peptide, or sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a follicular fluid constituent known to promote actin polymerization, increased the conversion of globular actin to the filamentous form, followed by increased nuclear YAP and expression of downstream connective tissue growth factor (CCN2). After short-term treatments with JASP or S1P, in vitro cultured and in vivo grafted ovaries showed follicle growth. Furthermore, induction of constitutively active YAP in ovarian grafts of transgenic mice enhanced follicle development, whereas treatment of human ovarian cortices with JASP or S1P increased CCN2 expression. Thus, JASP and S1P stimulate follicle growth and are potential therapeutic agents for treating polycystic ovarian syndrome and other ovarian disorders.

    View details for DOI 10.1096/fj.14-267856

    View details for Web of Science ID 000355209500019

    View details for PubMedID 25690654

  • Lgr5+cells regenerate hair cells via proliferation and direct transdifferentiation in damaged neonatal mouse utricle NATURE COMMUNICATIONS Wang, T., Chai, R., Kim, G. S., Pham, N., Jansson, L., Duc-Huy Nguyen, D. H., Kuo, B., May, L. A., Zuo, J., Cunningham, L. L., Cheng, A. G. 2015; 6

    View details for DOI 10.1038/ncomms7613

    View details for Web of Science ID 000353695500001

  • Making sense of Wnt signaling-linking hair cell regeneration to development FRONTIERS IN CELLULAR NEUROSCIENCE Jansson, L., Kim, G. S., Cheng, A. G. 2015; 9
  • Making sense of Wnt signaling-linking hair cell regeneration to development. Frontiers in cellular neuroscience Jansson, L., Kim, G. S., Cheng, A. G. 2015; 9: 66-?

    Abstract

    Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway crucial for development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Secreted Wnt ligands bind Frizzled receptors to regulate diverse processes such as axis patterning, cell division, and cell fate specification. They also serve to govern self-renewal of somatic stem cells in several adult tissues. The complexity of the pathway can be attributed to the myriad of Wnt and Frizzled combinations as well as its diverse context-dependent functions. In the developing mouse inner ear, Wnt signaling plays diverse roles, including specification of the otic placode and patterning of the otic vesicle. At later stages, its activity governs sensory hair cell specification, cell cycle regulation, and hair cell orientation. In regenerating sensory organs from non-mammalian species, Wnt signaling can also regulate the extent of proliferative hair cell regeneration. This review describes the current knowledge of the roles of Wnt signaling and Wnt-responsive cells in hair cell development and regeneration. We also discuss possible future directions and the potential application and limitation of Wnt signaling in augmenting hair cell regeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.3389/fncel.2015.00066

    View details for PubMedID 25814927

  • Lgr5+ cells regenerate hair cells via proliferation and direct transdifferentiation in damaged neonatal mouse utricle. Nature communications Wang, T., Chai, R., Kim, G. S., Pham, N., Jansson, L., Nguyen, D., Kuo, B., May, L. A., Zuo, J., Cunningham, L. L., Cheng, A. G. 2015; 6: 6613-?

    Abstract

    Recruitment of endogenous progenitors is critical during tissue repair. The inner ear utricle requires mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) to detect linear acceleration. After damage, non-mammalian utricles regenerate HCs via both proliferation and direct transdifferentiation. In adult mammals, limited transdifferentiation from unidentified progenitors occurs to regenerate extrastriolar Type II HCs. Here we show that HC damage in neonatal mouse utricle activates the Wnt target gene Lgr5 in striolar supporting cells. Lineage tracing and time-lapse microscopy reveal that Lgr5+ cells transdifferentiate into HC-like cells in vitro. In contrast to adults, HC ablation in neonatal utricles in vivo recruits Lgr5+ cells to regenerate striolar HCs through mitotic and transdifferentiation pathways. Both Type I and II HCs are regenerated, and regenerated HCs display stereocilia and synapses. Lastly, stabilized ß-catenin in Lgr5+ cells enhances mitotic activity and HC regeneration. Thus Lgr5 marks Wnt-regulated, damage-activated HC progenitors and may help uncover factors driving mammalian HC regeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/ncomms7613

    View details for PubMedID 25849379

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