Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Academic Appointments


  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology
  • Clinical Assistant Professor (By courtesy), Urology

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2013)
  • Fellowship:University of California Los Angeles (2013) CA
  • Residency:Columbia University (2010) NY
  • Medical Education:Keck School of Medicine University of Southern CA (2006) CA

Publications

All Publications


  • Glomus Tumor Excision With Clitoral Preservation JOURNAL OF LOWER GENITAL TRACT DISEASE Suharwardy, S., Mahal, A. S., Wieskopf, K., Rogo-Gupta, L. 2016; 20 (2): e20-e21
  • Symptom Improvement After Prolapse and Incontinence Graft Removal in a Case Series of 306 Patients FEMALE PELVIC MEDICINE AND RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Rogo-Gupta, L., Grisales, T., Huynh, L., Rodriguez, L. V., Raz, S. 2015; 21 (6): 319-324
  • Long-term symptom improvement and overall satisfaction after prolapse and incontinence graft removal. Female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery Rogo-Gupta, L., Huynh, L., Hartshorn, T. G., Rodríguez, L. V., Raz, S. 2013; 19 (6): 352-355

    Abstract

    We report long-term symptom improvements and overall satisfaction in patients after removal of grafts used in pelvic reconstruction in a tertiary referral center.We analyzed patients who underwent graft removal for treatment of related complications and who were followed for at least 2 years. Symptoms were determined by patient self-assessment questionnaires.Seventy-nine patients underwent partial or complete graft removal from 2005 to 2011 and met inclusion criteria. The mean follow-up time was 4.0 years (median, 3.4 years; range, 2.0-7.6 years). Forty-seven percent (37 patients) had implants for both prolapse and incontinence, 40% (32 patients) had incontinence implants only, and 13% (10 patients) had prolapse implants only. Thirty percent of those with both implants presented with multiple symptoms compared to 50% of those with prolapse implants and 44% of those with incontinence implants only. At follow-up, 75% (56 patients) reported that their symptoms were better and 15% (11 patients) reported that their symptoms were worse. Of patients who underwent graft removal for pain alone, 74% (17 patients) improved whereas17% (4 patients) were worse. When asked about spending the rest of their lives with their current symptoms, 49% (38 patients) reported positively whereas 44% (34 patients) reported negatively. Forty-one patients underwent one or more additional treatments.Graft-related complications are often treated with surgical excision. In a cohort of 79 patients in whom implants were removed an average of 4 years earlier, 75% still report symptom improvement and 49% report good quality of life. However, many patients still feel dissatisfied and sought additional treatment during long-term follow-up. These data can be used to counsel patients considering removal of pelvic reconstruction grafts.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/SPV.0b013e3182a4488b

    View details for PubMedID 24165449

  • Current trends in surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse CURRENT OPINION IN OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY Rogo-Gupta, L. 2013; 25 (5): 395-398

    Abstract

    Over the past decade, surgical prolapse correction has evolved significantly, taking a sharp turn in 2011 when the USFDA publicly questioned synthetic graft safety. This controversy has been widely publicized and debated amongst laymen and experts alike. This review summarizes current trends in mesh implantation for prolapse repair, highlighting the impact of the current controversy.Recent studies revealed nonmesh prolapse repair may have better outcomes than previously reported; the USFDA states there is insufficient evidence to support vaginal mesh for apical or posterior compartment prolapse; mesh prolapse repair increased over the past decade, 75% of which was placed vaginally; approximately 30% of mesh prolapse repair is performed with hysterectomy and approximately 40% is performed with concomitant incontinence repair. Anterior and apical prolapse are most likely to include mesh and of apical repair procedures, minimally invasive approaches exceed laparotomy.This year's population-based studies describe the impact of surgeon experience, prolapse compartment, and national trends in surgical technique on mesh prolapse repair. The impact of the recent investigation on future mesh use remains unknown.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/GCO.0b013e3283648cfb

    View details for Web of Science ID 000326586300009

    View details for PubMedID 24018877

  • Trends in the Surgical Management of Stress Urinary Incontinence Among Female Medicare Beneficiaries, 2002-2007 UROLOGY Rogo-Gupta, L., Litwin, M. S., Saigal, C. S., Anger, J. T. 2013; 82 (1): 38-42

    Abstract

    To describe trends in the surgical management of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the United States from 2002 to 2007.As part of the Urologic Diseases of America Project, we analyzed data from a 5% national random sample of female Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older. Data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services carrier and outpatient files from 2002 to 2007. Women who were diagnosed with urinary incontinence identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition (ICD-9) diagnosis codes and who underwent surgical management identified by Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition (CPT-4) procedure codes were included in the analysis. Trends were analyzed over the 6-year period. Unweighted procedure counts were multiplied by 20 to estimate the rate among all female Medicare beneficiaries.The total number of surgical procedures remained stable during the study period, from 49,340 in 2002 to 49,900 in 2007. Slings were the most common procedure across all years, which increased from 25,840 procedures in 2002 to 33,880 procedures in 2007. Injectable bulking agents were the second most common procedure, which accounted for 14,100 procedures in 2002 but decreased to 11,320 in 2007. Procedures performed in ambulatory surgery centers and physician offices increased, although those performed in inpatient settings declined. Hospital outpatient procedures remained stable.The surgical management of women with SUI shifted toward a dominance of procedures performed in ambulatory surgery centers from 2002 to 2007, although the overall number of procedures remained stable. Slings remained the dominant surgical procedure, followed by injectable bulking agents, both of which are easily performed in outpatient settings.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.urology.2012.10.087

    View details for Web of Science ID 000321036200013

    View details for PubMedID 23706251

  • How Dry is "OAB-Dry"? Perspectives from Patients and Physician Experts JOURNAL OF UROLOGY Anger, J. T., Le, T. X., Nissim, H. A., Rogo-Gupta, L., Rashid, R., Behniwal, A., Smith, A. L., Litwin, M. S., Rodriguez, L. V., Wein, A. J., Maliski, S. L. 2012; 188 (5): 1811-1815

    Abstract

    Overactive bladder is subtyped into overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry, based on the presence or absence, respectively, of urgency incontinence. To better understand patient and physician perspectives on symptoms among women with overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry, we performed patient focus groups and interviews with experts in urinary incontinence.Five focus groups totaling 33 patients with overactive bladder symptoms, including 3 groups of overactive bladder-wet and 2 groups of overactive bladder-dry patients, were conducted. Topics addressed patient perceptions of overactive bladder symptoms, treatments and outcomes. A total of 12 expert interviews were then done in which experts were asked to describe their views on overactive bladder-wet and overactive bladder-dry. Focus groups and expert interviews were transcribed verbatim. Qualitative data analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology, as described by Charmaz.During the focus groups sessions, women screened as overactive bladder-dry shared the knowledge that they would probably leak if no toilet were available. This knowledge was based on a history of leakage episodes in the past. Those few patients with no history of leakage had a clinical picture more consistent with painful bladder syndrome than overactive bladder. Physician expert interviews revealed the belief that many patients labeled as overactive bladder-dry may actually be mild overactive bladder-wet.Qualitative data from focus groups and interviews with experts suggest that a spectrum exists between very mild overactive bladder-wet and severe overactive bladder-wet. Scientific investigations are needed to determine whether urgency without fear of leakage constitutes a unique clinical entity.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.juro.2012.07.044

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310438600049

    View details for PubMedID 22999694

  • Long-Term Durability of the Distal Urethral Polypropylene Sling for the Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence: Minimum 11-Year Followup JOURNAL OF UROLOGY Rogo-Gupta, L., Baxter, Z. C., Ngoc-Bich Le, N. B., Raz, S., Rodriguez, L. V. 2012; 188 (5): 1822-1827

    Abstract

    We report on the long-term outcomes of the distal urethral polypropylene sling for stress urinary incontinence in a patient cohort that was closely followed and whose outcomes were reported at 1 and 5 years after surgery.We performed a prospective study of all consecutive patients who underwent a distal urethral polypropylene sling procedure between November 1999 and April 2000. The 1 and 5-year outcomes for this particular patient cohort were previously reported. At the minimum 11-year followup, outcome was determined by patient self-assessment including validated questionnaires.A total of 69 patients were followed prospectively and followup was obtained for 30. Of those lost to followup 10 were deceased and 5 were cognitively impaired. Mean patient age at followup was 73 years (range 40 to 97). More than 11 years after surgery 48% of patients reported no stress urinary incontinence symptoms and 63% were never bothered by stress urinary incontinence. Patients reported a mean overall symptom improvement of 64% compared to 81% at 5 years. Overall 82% of patients met the criteria for treatment success by symptom scores and 80% met the criteria by bother scores.The distal urethral polypropylene sling procedure has excellent long-term durability in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence, in addition to low morbidity and low cost as previously described. Eleven years after the procedure the majority of patients report symptom improvement. Nevertheless, many older patients are unable to participate in followup. When choosing an anti-incontinence procedure, durability should be considered in light of patient age given that the theoretical advantages of long-term durability are limited by cognitive decline and mortality.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.juro.2012.07.033

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310438600051

    View details for PubMedID 22999687

  • Trends in Surgical Mesh Use for Pelvic Organ Prolapse From 2000 to 2010 OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Rogo-Gupta, L., Rodriguez, L. V., Litwin, M. S., Herzog, T. J., Neugut, A. I., Lu, Y., Raz, S., Hershman, D. L., Wright, J. D. 2012; 120 (5): 1105-1115

    Abstract

    To describe trends in and predictors of surgical mesh use for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair and to estimate the influence of safety advisories on mesh use.Analysis of women aged 18 years and older recorded in a health care quality and resource utilization database who underwent POP repair from 2000 to 2010, identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes, and stratified by mesh use. Odds ratios were calculated with adjustments for patient, physician, and hospital-level characteristics.Among 273,275 women in the cohort, 64,968 (23.8%) underwent a mesh-augmented repair. Concurrent incontinence surgery was a strong predictor of mesh use (odds ratio [OR] 9.95; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.70-10.21). Mesh use increased from 7.9% in 2000 to a peak of 32.1% in 2006, and declined slightly to 27.5% in 2010. Among women without incontinence, mesh use increased from 3.3% in 2000 to 13.5% in 2006, and remained stable at 12.8% in 2010. Intermediate-volume (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.44-1.62) and high-volume (OR 2.74; 95% CI 2.58-2.92) surgeons were more likely to use mesh than low-volume surgeons. Compared with women who underwent operation by gynecologists, those treated by urologists were more than three times more likely to undergo mesh-augmented prolapse repair (OR 3.36; 95% CI 3.09-3.66). Black women were 27% less likely to undergo mesh repair (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.66-0.82).Mesh-augmented prolapse repairs increased substantially over the past decade, and this increase was most pronounced in the years before the publication of safety advisories. Physician specialty and surgical volume are important factors underlying mesh use. Additional measures must ensure evidence-based use of mesh for pelvic reconstruction.II.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31826ebcc2

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310512500018

    View details for PubMedID 23090529

  • Foreign body in the bladder 11 years after intravaginal pessary INTERNATIONAL UROGYNECOLOGY JOURNAL Rogo-Gupta, L., Le, N., Raz, S. 2012; 23 (9): 1311-1313

    Abstract

    Vaginal pessaries used for symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP) rarely develop complications when regularly monitored. However, many reports of complications of neglected pessaries have been described. Patients presenting with pessary complications report a variety of symptoms ranging from malodorous discharge or recurrent infections to more severe symptoms such as vaginal bleeding, complete urinary incontinence, or defecatory obstruction. Complete pessary encapsulation within the bladder is rare. We present the case of a 79-year-old postmenopausal woman referred to a tertiary care center for treatment of a large intravesical foreign body 11 years after pessary placement. The patient successfully underwent minimally invasive surgery to remove the foreign body and repair the bladder defect. Physicians should have a low threshold for diagnostic imaging in patients presenting with unclear history. Large intravesical foreign bodies can be removed by a vaginal approach with good outcomes.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00192-012-1722-2

    View details for Web of Science ID 000307705500028

    View details for PubMedID 22402642

  • Surgical options for apical prolapse repair. Women's health (London, England) Le, N., Rogo-Gupta, L., Raz, S. 2012; 8 (5): 557-566

    Abstract

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a common medical condition that affects the quality of life of many women. Approximately 50% of parous women have pelvic organ prolapse and the lifetime risk for surgical intervention is 6.7% at the age of 80 years. In the USA, the number of women at risk for symptomatic prolapse is increasing, which is consistent with the recent increase in the overall number of prolapse and incontinence procedures being performed. Although prolapse is usually multicompartmental and isolated defects are rare, the apical compartment deserves special attention because apical support is integral to a durable prolapse repair. Since many women may initially present to their primary care physicians, all members of the medical community should have a basic understanding of the diagnosis and treatment for apical prolapse.

    View details for DOI 10.2217/whe.12.44

    View details for PubMedID 22934729

  • Missed diagnosis of complete urethral transection after sling: the case for translabial ultrasound. Female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery Rogo-Gupta, L., Le, N., Raz, S. 2012; 18 (1): 60-62

    Abstract

    Patients with complications of urethral sling placement for stress urinary incontinence are often treated for recurrent symptoms for years after initial reassuring evaluation. Translabial ultrasound is a noninvasive modality with minimal risks that can clearly diagnose urethral mesh complications. We present a 47-year-old premenopausal woman referred for treatment of urethral stricture and diverticulum 8 years after mesh sling placement. The diagnosis was made at an outside institution by voiding cystourethrogram and cystoscopy. However, translabial ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of complete urethral transection, and the patient underwent a complex urethral reconstruction. Ultrasound should be used to evaluate patients with a history of urethral sling and persistent lower urinary tract symptoms. Referral to a center with advanced pelvic reconstruction services may be required.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/SPV.0b013e31823bc342

    View details for PubMedID 22453271

  • The Effect of Surgeon Volume on Outcomes and Resource Use for Vaginal Hysterectomy OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Rogo-Gupta, L. J., Lewin, S. N., Kim, J. H., Burke, W. M., Sun, X., Herzog, T. J., Wright, J. D. 2010; 116 (6): 1341-1347

    Abstract

    To estimate the effect of surgical volume on outcomes and resource use in women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy.Women who underwent total vaginal hysterectomy and were registered in the Perspective database were examined. Perspective is a nationwide database developed to measure quality and resource use. Procedure-associated intraoperative, perioperative, and postoperative medical complications as well as hospital readmission, length of stay, intensive care unit (ICU) use, operating time, and cost were analyzed. Based on the overall gynecologic surgical volume and vaginal surgical volume of their surgeons, patients were stratified into tertiles. Complications were compared using adjusted generalized estimating equations and reported as odds ratios (ORs).A total of 77,109 patients operated on by 6,195 gynecologic surgeons were identified. After adjustment for the effects of other demographic variables and concomitant procedures, patients operated on by high-volume vaginal surgeons were 31% (OR 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.80) less likely to experience an operative injury, whereas perioperative complications were reduced by 19% (OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.72-0.92), medical complications decreased by 24% (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.67-0.86), ICU admission reduced by 46% (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.43-0.73), and the transfusion rate decreased by 28% (OR 0.72; 95% CI 0.61-0.85) in patients treated by high-volume vaginal surgeons, whereas rates of readmission were higher (OR 1.24; 95% CI 1.04-1.47) in patients treated by high-volume surgeons. Operative times were lower in patients operated on by high-volume surgeons (P<.001). Although total gynecologic surgical volume had no effect on cost, patients treated by high-volume vaginal surgeons had lower costs (P<.001).Perioperative morbidity and resource use are lower in women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy when the procedure is performed by high-volume vaginal surgeons.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/AOG.0b013e3181fca8c5

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284491000015

    View details for PubMedID 21099600