Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Anesthesia
  • Anesthesia, Pediatric

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatric Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology (2013)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2002) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2000) CA
  • Residency:University of Michigan Health System (1995) MI
  • Board Certification: Anesthesia, American Board of Anesthesiology (2002)
  • Internship:University of Michigan Health System (1993) MI
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine (1992) CA

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Gene Transfer for Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Recruiting

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is a severe inherited blistering skin disease caused by absence of a protein known as type VII collagen. Patients with RDEB develop large, severely painful blisters and open wounds from minor trauma to their skin. This trial will create a graft, which the investigators call "LEAES," of the patient's own skin that has been genetically engineered in the investigators lab to express this missing protein. The purpose of this study is to achieve proof-of-concept for this general approach to cell-based gene therapy in humans and to set the stage for further therapeutic extension in RDEB. The investigators will basically take a subject's own cells, correct them in culture, and then transplant the corrected cells back onto them.

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Teaching

2015-16 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Anesthetic concerns for robot-assisted laparoscopy in an infant ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA Mariano, E. R., Furukawa, L., Woo, R. K., Albanese, C. T., Brock-Utne, J. G. 2004; 99 (6): 1665-1667

    Abstract

    A 2-mo-old infant with biliary atresia was scheduled for laparoscopic Kasai with robot assistance. Before surgery, a practice trial maneuvering the cumbersome robotic equipment was performed to ensure rapid access to the patient in case of emergency. IV access, tracheal intubation, and arterial line placement followed inhaled anesthesia induction with sevoflurane. Robotic setup took 53 min and severely limited patient access. No adverse events occurred during the procedure requiring the removal of the robotic equipment, and the patient was discharged after a stable postoperative recovery. Advance preparation is required to maximize patient safety during robotic surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1213/01.ANE.0000137394.99683.66

    View details for Web of Science ID 000225341600016

    View details for PubMedID 15562050