Clinical Focus

  • Internal Medicine
  • Geriatrics

Academic Appointments

Administrative Appointments

  • Medical Director, Stanford Senior Care Clinic (2014 - Present)

Honors & Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Carleton College (1997)
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, UCLA School of Medicine (2003)
  • William B. Valentine Award in Medicine for distinction as a scholar of Internal Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine (2003)
  • Janet M. Glascow Memorial Achievment Citation (for women in top 10% of medical school class), UCLA School of Medicine (2003)
  • Award for Professionalism, Stanford University Department of Medicine, Internal Medicine Residency (2005 and 2006)
  • Physician's Award for Service to the Cardinal Free Clinics, Stanford University School of Medicine (2007)
  • Outstanding Community Preceptor (Pre-clerkship) Award, Stanford University School of Medicine (2010)
  • Advocacy and Community Service Award, Society of General Internal Medicine California-Hawaii Region (2014)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations

  • Member, The American Geriatrics Society (2011 - Present)

Professional Education

  • Residency:Stanford University Hospital -Clinical Excellence Research Center (2006) CA
  • Fellowship:VA Medical Center Palo Alto (2011) CA
  • Board Certification: Geriatric Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2011)
  • Masters in Public Health, UC Berkeley, Epidemiology (2008)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2006)
  • Medical Education:UCLA School of Medicine (2003) CA
  • BA, Carleton College, Northfield, MN, Neuroscience (1997)

Community and International Work

  • Pacific Free Clinic, San Jose


    Care of uninsured

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics

    Populations Served

    primarily Vietnamese and Latino immigrants


    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project


    Opportunities for Student Involvement


Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests

Providing quality interdisciplinary care to older patients with complex conditions, dementia, or frailty
Health care delivery in low-income and low English proficiency communities
Improving health care delivery systems for older adults, particularly those with advanced illness and caregiver dependence
Advance care planning


  • Primary Care 2.0, Stanford Healthcare and Stanford University School of Medicine (9/1/2014)

    on Design Team for reinventing primary care at Stanford


    Stanford, CA

  • Care Transitions Working Group, Stanford Health Care (2/1/2015)

    Collaborative efforts across Stanford Health Care to support patients in safely and successfully transitiiong to home and rehabilitation facilities


    Stanford, CA


All Publications

  • Chronic Hepatitis B Management Based on Standard Guidelines in Community Primary Care and Specialty Clinics DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES Ku, K. C., Li, J., Ha, N. B., Martin, M., Nguyen, V. G., Nguyen, M. H. 2013; 58 (12): 3626-3633


    Prior studies have underlined the need for increased screening and awareness of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), especially in certain high-risk populations. However, few studies have examined the patterns of evaluation and management of CHB between primary care physicians (PCP) and specialists according to commonly-used professional guidelines. Our goal was to examine whether necessary laboratory parameters used to determine disease status and eligibility for antiviral therapy were performed by PCPs and specialists.We conducted a retrospective study of 253 treatment-naïve CHB patients who were evaluated by PCP only (n = 63) or by specialists (n = 190) for CHB at a community multispecialty medical center between March 2007 and June 2009. Criteria for CHB management and treatment eligibility were based on the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases 2007 guideline and the US Panel 2006 algorithm. Required parameters for optimal evaluation for CHB included hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Preferred antiviral agents for CHB included pegylated interferon, adefovir, and entecavir.The majority of patients were Asians (90 %) and male (54 %) with a mean age of 43 ± 11.6 years. Compared to PCPs, specialists were more likely to order laboratory testing for ALT (94 vs. 86 %, P = 0.05), HBeAg (67 vs. 41 %, P < 0.0001) and HBV DNA (83 vs. 52 %, P < 0.0001). The proportion of patients having all three laboratory parameters was significantly higher among those evaluated by specialists compared to PCP (62 vs. 33 %, P < 0.0001). A total of 55 patients were initiated on antiviral treatment (n = 47 by specialists and n = 6 by PCPs). Lamivudine was prescribed more often by PCPs than specialists (33 vs. 2 %, P = 0.05). Preferred agents were used 96 % of the time by specialists compared to 67 % of those treated by PCPs (P = 0.05).Patients evaluated by specialists for CHB are more likely to undergo more complete laboratory evaluation and, if eligible, are also more likely to be treated with preferred longer-term agents for CHB compared to those evaluated by PCPs only. A collaborative model of care involving both PCP and specialists may further optimize management of patients with CHB.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10620-013-2889-1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000327456500033

    View details for PubMedID 24122622

  • Consequences of Federal Patient Transfer Regulations: Effect of the 2003 EMTALA Revision on a Tertiary Referral Center and Evidence of Possible Misuse ARCHIVES OF INTERNAL MEDICINE Kao, D. P., Martin, M. H., Das, A. K., Ruoss, S. J. 2012; 172 (11): 891-892

    View details for Web of Science ID 000305087600015

    View details for PubMedID 22688995

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