Clinical Focus

  • Neurology

Academic Appointments

Professional Education

  • Board Certification: Vascular Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2014)
  • Fellowship:Stanford University School of Medicine (2013) CA
  • Residency:Stanford University School of Medicine (2012) CA
  • Board Certification: Neurology, American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (2012)
  • Internship:Stanford University Medical Center (2009) CA
  • Medical Education:Harvard Medical School (2008) MA
  • Bachelor of Engineering, Tulane University of Louisiana (1999)

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials

  • Imaging Collaterals in Acute Stroke (iCAS) Recruiting

    Stroke is caused by a sudden blockage of a blood vessel that delivers blood to the brain. Unblocking the blood vessel with a blood clot removal device restores blood flow and if done quickly may prevent the disability that can be caused by a stroke. However, not all stroke patients benefit from having their blood vessel unblocked. The aim of this study is to determine if special brain imaging, called MRI, can be used to identify which stroke patients are most likely to benefit from attempts to unblock their blood vessel with a special blood clot removal device. In particular, we will assess in this trial whether a noncontrast MR imaging sequence, arterial spin labeling (ASL), can demonstrate the presence of collateral blood flow (compared with a gold standard of the angiogram) and whether it is useful to predict who will benefit from treatment.

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  • Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Triage and Evaluation of Stroke Risk Recruiting

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a transient neurological deficit (speech disturbance, weakness…), caused by temporary occlusion of a brain vessel by a blood clot that leaves no lasting effect. TIA diagnosis can be challenging and an expert stroke evaluation combined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve the diagnosis accuracy. The risk of a debilitating stroke can be as high as 5% during the first 72 hrs after TIA. TIA characteristics (duration, type of symptoms, age of the patient), the presence of a significant narrowing of the neck vessels responsible for the patient's symptoms (symptomatic stenosis), and an abnormal MRI are associated with an increased risk of stroke. An emergent evaluation and treatment of TIA patients by a stroke specialist could reduce the risk of stroke to 2%. Stanford has implemented an expedited triage pathway for TIA patients combining a clinical evaluation by a stroke neurologist, an acute MRI of the brain and the vessels and a sampling of biomarkers (Lp-PLA2). The investigators are investigating the yield of this unique approach to improve TIA diagnosis, prognosis and secondary stroke prevention. The objective of this prospective cohort study is to determine which factors will help the physician to confirm the diagnosis of TIA and to define the risk of stroke after a TIA.

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All Publications

  • Novel Stroke Therapeutics: Unraveling Stroke Pathophysiology and Its Impact on Clinical Treatments. Neuron George, P. M., Steinberg, G. K. 2015; 87 (2): 297-309


    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Over the past few decades our understanding of the pathophysiology of stroke has increased, but greater insight is required to advance the field of stroke recovery. Clinical treatments have improved in the acute time window, but long-term therapeutics remain limited. Complex neural circuits damaged by ischemia make restoration of function after stroke difficult. New therapeutic approaches, including cell transplantation or stimulation, focus on reestablishing these circuits through multiple mechanisms to improve circuit plasticity and remodeling. Other research targets intact networks to compensate for damaged regions. This review highlights several important mechanisms of stroke injury and describes emerging therapies aimed at improving clinical outcomes.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.041

    View details for PubMedID 26182415

  • Aortic arch atheroma: a plaque of a different color or more of the same? Stroke; a journal of cerebral circulation George, P. M., Albers, G. W. 2014; 45 (5): 1239-1240

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.004827

    View details for PubMedID 24699053

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