Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Allergy and Immunology
  • Food Allergy
  • Asthma

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Allergy and Immunology, American Board of Internal Medicine (2014)
  • Fellowship:Boston Medical Center (2013) MA
  • Fellowship:Boston Medical Center (2011) MA
  • Residency:California Pacific Medical Center (2008) CA
  • Medical Education:Drexel University College of Medicine (2004) PA
  • Board Certification: Critical Care Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2012)
  • Board Certification: Pulmonary Disease, American Board of Internal Medicine (2010)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2007)

Research & Scholarship

Clinical Trials


  • Safety Study of Viaskin Peanut to Treat Peanut Allergy Recruiting

    This study evaluates the safety of Viaskin Peanut 250 mcg in the treatment of peanut allergy in children from 4 to 11 years of age. Subjects will receive either Viaskin Peanut 250 mcg or a placebo for a period of 6 months, after which all subjects will be receiving the active treatment up to a period of 3 years under active treatment.

    View full details

Publications

All Publications


  • Assessing basophil activation by using flow cytometry and mass cytometry in blood stored 24 hours before analysis. journal of allergy and clinical immunology Mukai, K., Gaudenzio, N., Gupta, S., Vivanco, N., Bendall, S. C., Maecker, H. T., Chinthrajah, R. S., Tsai, M., Nadeau, K. C., Galli, S. J. 2016

    Abstract

    Basophil activation tests (BATs) have promise for research and for clinical monitoring of patients with allergies. However, BAT protocols vary in blood anticoagulant used and temperature and time of storage before testing, complicating comparisons of results from various studies.We attempted to establish a BAT protocol that would permit analysis of blood within 24 hours of obtaining the sample.Blood from 46 healthy donors and 120 patients with peanut allergy was collected into EDTA or heparin tubes, and samples were stored at 4°C or room temperature for 4 or 24 hours before performing BATs.Stimulation with anti-IgE or IL-3 resulted in strong upregulation of basophil CD203c in samples collected in EDTA or heparin, stored at 4°C, and analyzed 24 hours after sample collection. However, a CD63(hi) population of basophils was not observed in any conditions in EDTA-treated samples unless exogenous calcium/magnesium was added at the time of anti-IgE stimulation. By contrast, blood samples collected in heparin tubes were adequate for quantification of upregulation of basophil CD203c and identification of a population of CD63(hi) basophils, irrespective of whether the specimens were analyzed by means of conventional flow cytometry or cytometry by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and such tests could be performed after blood was stored for 24 hours at 4°C.BATs to measure upregulation of basophil CD203c and induction of a CD63(hi) basophil population can be conducted with blood obtained in heparin tubes and stored at 4°C for 24 hours.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.04.060

    View details for PubMedID 27527263

  • Molecular and cellular mechanisms of food allergy and food tolerance. journal of allergy and clinical immunology Chinthrajah, R. S., Hernandez, J. D., Boyd, S. D., Galli, S. J., Nadeau, K. C. 2016; 137 (4): 984-997

    Abstract

    Ingestion of innocuous antigens, including food proteins, normally results in local and systemic immune nonresponsiveness in a process termed oral tolerance. Oral tolerance to food proteins is likely to be intimately linked to mechanisms that are responsible for gastrointestinal tolerance to large numbers of commensal microbes. Here we review our current understanding of the immune mechanisms responsible for oral tolerance and how perturbations in these mechanisms might promote the loss of oral tolerance and development of food allergies. Roles for the commensal microbiome in promoting oral tolerance and the association of intestinal dysbiosis with food allergy are discussed. Growing evidence supports cutaneous sensitization to food antigens as one possible mechanism leading to the failure to develop or loss of oral tolerance. A goal of immunotherapy for food allergies is to induce sustained desensitization or even true long-term oral tolerance to food allergens through mechanisms that might in part overlap with those associated with the development of natural oral tolerance.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2016.02.004

    View details for PubMedID 27059726

  • T-Cell Immunophenotyping of Second-Hand Smoke-related Asthma. Annals of the American Thoracic Society Bauer, R. N., Chinthrajah, R. S., Andorf, S., Hobson, B., Miller, R. L., Nadeau, K. C. 2016; 13: S95-?

    View details for DOI 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201507-457MG

    View details for PubMedID 27027962

  • Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Ryan, J. F., Hovde, R., Glanville, J., Lyu, S., Ji, X., Gupta, S., Tibshirani, R. J., Jay, D. C., Boyd, S. D., Chinthrajah, R. S., Davis, M. M., Galli, S. J., Maecker, H. T., Nadeau, K. C. 2016; 113 (9): E1286-95

    Abstract

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1520180113

    View details for PubMedID 26811452

  • Diagnosis of Food Allergy PEDIATRIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Chinthrajah, R. S., Tupa, D., Prince, B. T., Block, W. M., Rosa, J. S., Singh, A. M., Nadeau, K. 2015; 62 (6): 1393-?
  • Oral immunotherapy for the treatment of food allergy HUMAN VACCINES & IMMUNOTHERAPEUTICS Begin, P., Chinthrajah, R. S., Nadeau, K. C. 2014; 10 (8): 2295-2302

    Abstract

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an emerging new therapy for food allergy. With multiple small exploratory trials and some large randomized-controlled phase 2 trials recently published and under way, there is a clear progress and interest toward making this a treatment option for patients suffering from food allergies. However, there are still many questions to be answered and parameters to fine-tune before OIT becomes an accepted option outside of the research setting. This review covers the main milestones in the development of OIT for food allergy and further discusses important specific issues that will have direct impact on its clinical application. More specifically, previous publications showing evidence for the induction of tolerance are specifically reviewed and varying safety, tolerability and efficacy parameters from previous reports are also discussed.

    View details for DOI 10.4161/hv.29233

    View details for Web of Science ID 000344318300027

    View details for PubMedID 25424935