Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatric Gastroenterology, American Board of Pediatrics (2015)
  • Fellowship:Stanford Children's Hospital (2014) CA
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2010)
  • Residency:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (2010) CA
  • Medical Education:Stanford School of Medicine (2007) CA

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Pediatric liver transplant, outcomes, adherence, transition, liver failure

Publications

All Publications


  • Novel protocol including liver biopsy to identify and treat CD8+T-cell predominant acute hepatitis and liver failure PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION McKenzie, R. B., Berquist, W. E., Nadeau, K. C., Louie, C. Y., Chen, S. F., Sibley, R. K., Glader, B. E., Wong, W. B., Hofmann, L. V., Esquivel, C. O., Cox, K. L. 2014; 18 (5): 503-509

    Abstract

    In the majority of children with ALF, the etiology is unknown and liver transplantation is often needed for survival. A patient case prompted us to consider that immune dysregulation may be the cause of indeterminate acute hepatitis and liver failure in children. Our study includes nine pediatric patients treated under a multidisciplinary clinical protocol to identify and treat immune-mediated acute liver injury. Patients with evidence of inflammation and no active infection on biopsy received treatment with intravenous immune globulin and methylprednisolone. Seven patients had at least one positive immune marker before or after treatment. All patients had a CD8+ T-cell predominant liver injury that completely or partially responded to immune therapy. Five of the nine patients recovered liver function and did not require liver transplantation. Three of these patients subsequently developed bone marrow failure and were treated with either immunosuppression or stem cell transplant. This series highlights the importance of this tissue-based approach to diagnosis and treatment that may improve transplant-free survival. Further research is necessary to better characterize the immune injury and to predict the subset of patients at risk for bone marrow failure who may benefit from earlier and stronger immunosuppressive therapy.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/petr.12296

    View details for Web of Science ID 000339160400024

    View details for PubMedID 24930635

  • Rapid Implementation of Inpatient Electronic Physician Documentation at an Academic Hospital APPLIED CLINICAL INFORMATICS Hahn, J. S., Bernstein, J. A., MCKENZIE, R. B., King, B. J., Longhurst, C. A. 2012; 3 (2): 175-185

    Abstract

    Electronic physician documentation is an essential element of a complete electronic medical record (EMR). At Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, a teaching hospital affiliated with Stanford University, we implemented an inpatient electronic documentation system for physicians over a 12-month period. Using an EMR-based free-text editor coupled with automated import of system data elements, we were able to achieve voluntary, widespread adoption of the electronic documentation process. When given the choice between electronic versus dictated report creation, the vast majority of users preferred the electronic method. In addition to increasing the legibility and accessibility of clinical notes, we also decreased the volume of dictated notes and scanning of handwritten notes, which provides the opportunity for cost savings to the institution.

    View details for DOI 10.4338/ACI-2012-02-CR-0003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000317183500003

    View details for PubMedID 23620718