Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Chicago (2006)
  • Bachelor of Science, Stanford University, EE-BSH (2001)
  • Doctor of Medicine, University of Chicago (2009)
  • Bachelor of Science, Stanford University, BIOL-BS (2001)
  • Fellow, Stanford University, Hematology and Oncology
  • Resident, Stanford University, Medicine (2011)
  • Intern, Stanford University, Medicine (2010)

Stanford Advisors


Research & Scholarship

Lab Affiliations


Teaching

Graduate and Fellowship Programs


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Cryptococcal osteomyelitis and meningitis in a patient with non-hodgkin's lymphoma treated with PEP-C. BMJ case reports To, C. A., Hsieh, R. W., McClellan, J. S., Howard, W., Fischbein, N. J., Brown, J. M., Felsher, D. W., Fan, A. C. 2012; 2012

    Abstract

    The authors present the first case report of a patient with lymphoma who developed disseminated cryptococcal osteomyelitis and meningitis while being treated with the PEP-C (prednisone, etoposide, procarbazine and cyclophosphamide) chemotherapy regimen. During investigation of fever and new bony lesions, fungal culture from a rib biopsy revealed that the patient had cryptococcal osteomyelitis. Further evaluation demonstrated concurrent cryptococcal meningitis. The patient's disseminated cryptococcal infections completely resolved after a full course of antifungal treatment. Cryptococcal osteomyelitis is itself an extremely rare diagnosis, and the unique presentation with concurrent cryptococcal meningitis in our patient with lymphoma was likely due to his PEP-C treatment. It is well recognised that prolonged intensive chemotherapeutic regimens place patients at risk for atypical infections; yet physicians should recognise that even chronic low-dose therapies can put patients at risk for fungal infections. Physicians should consider fungal infections as part of the infectious investigation of a lymphopaenic patient on PEP-C.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bcr.08.2011.4578

    View details for PubMedID 22962380

  • Molecular characterization of a B-ring unsaturated estrogen: Implications for conjugated equine estrogen components of Premarin STEROIDS Hsieh, R. W., Rajan, S. S., Sharma, S. K., Greene, G. L. 2008; 73 (1): 59-68

    Abstract

    Conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) are routinely used for hormone replacement therapy (HRT), making it important to understand the activities of individual estrogenic components. Although 17beta-estradiol (17beta-E2), the most potent estrogen in CEE, has been extensively characterized, the actions of nine additional less potent estrogens are not well understood. Structural differences between CEEs and 17beta-E2 result in altered interactions with the two estrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) and different biological activities. To better understand these interactions, we have determined the crystal structure of the CEE analog, 17beta-methyl-17alpha-dihydroequilenin (NCI 122), in complex with the ERalpha ligand-binding domain and a peptide from the glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) coactivator. NCI 122 has chemical properties, including an unsaturated B-ring and 17alpha-hydroxyl group, which are shared with some of the estrogens found in CEEs. Structural analysis of the NCI 122-ERalpha LBD-GRIP1 complex, combined with biochemical and cell-based comparisons of CEE components, suggests that factors such as decreased ligand flexibility, decreased ligand hydrophobicity and loss of a hydrogen bond between the 17-hydroxyl group and His524, contribute significantly to the reduced potency of CEEs on ERalpha.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ste.roids.2007.08.014

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252602600007

    View details for PubMedID 17949766

  • Identification of ligands with bicyclic scaffolds provides insights into mechanisms of estrogen receptor subtype selectivity JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Hsieh, R. W., Rajan, S. S., Sharma, S. K., Guo, Y., DeSombre, E. R., Mrksich, M., Greene, G. L. 2006; 281 (26): 17909-17919

    Abstract

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) and beta (ERbeta) have distinct functions and differential expression in certain tissues. These differences have stimulated the search for subtype-selective ligands. Therapeutically, such ligands offer the potential to target specific tissues or pathways regulated by one receptor subtype without affecting the other. As reagents, they can be utilized to probe the physiological functions of the ER subtypes to provide information complementary to that obtained from knock-out animals. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay was used to screen a 10,000-compound chemical library for ER agonists. From the screen, we identified a family of ERbeta-selective agonists whose members contain bulky oxabicyclic scaffolds in place of the planar scaffolds common to most ER ligands. These agonists are 10-50-fold selective for ERbeta in competitive binding assays and up to 60-fold selective in transactivation assays. The weak uterotrophic activity of these ligands in immature rats and their ability to stimulate expression of an ERbeta regulated gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells provides more physiological evidence of their ERbeta-selective nature. To provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of their activity and selectivity, we determined the crystal structures of the ERalpha ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a peptide from the glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) coactivator complexed with the ligands OBCP-3M, OBCP-2M, and OBCP-1M. These structures illustrate how the bicyclic scaffolds of these ligands are accommodated in the flexible ligand-binding pocket of ER. A comparison of these structures with existing ER structures suggests that the ERbeta selectivity of OBCP ligands can be attributed to a combination of their interactions with Met-336 in ERbeta and Met-421 in ERalpha. These bicyclic ligands show promise as lead compounds that can target ERbeta. In addition, our understanding of the molecular determinants of their subtype selectivity provides a useful starting point for developing other ER modulators belonging to this relatively new structural class.

    View details for DOI 10.1074/jbc.M513684200

    View details for Web of Science ID 000238490300041

    View details for PubMedID 16648639

  • Label-free detection of protein-protein interactions on biochips ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION Yeo, W. S., Min, D. H., Hsieh, R. W., GREENE, G. L., Mrksich, M. 2005; 44 (34): 5480-5483

    View details for DOI 10.1002/anie.200501363

    View details for Web of Science ID 000231639400016

    View details for PubMedID 16052641

  • Interdigital cantilever as a biological sensor PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 1ST IEEE CONFERENCE ON NANOTECHNOLOGY Sulchek, T., Hsieh, R., Minne, S. C., Quate, C. F., Manalis, S. R. 2001: 562-566
  • High-speed atomic force microscopy in liquid REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS Sulchek, T., Hsieh, R., Adams, J. D., Minne, S. C., Quate, C. F., Adderton, D. M. 2000; 71 (5): 2097-2099
  • High-speed tapping mode imaging with active Q control for atomic force microscopy APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS Sulchek, T., Hsieh, R., Adams, J. D., Yaralioglu, G. G., Minne, S. C., Quate, C. F., Cleveland, J. P., Atalar, A., Adderton, D. M. 2000; 76 (11): 1473-1475

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