Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Cardiology

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Residency:Weill Cornell School of Medicine (2005) NY
  • Internship:Weill Cornell School of Medicine (2003) NY
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Cardiology, American Board of Pediatric Cardiology (2008)
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2005)
  • Fellowship:New York Presbyterian Hospital Columbia (2008) NY
  • Fellowship:Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford (2009) CA
  • Medical Education:Robert Wood Johnson Med School (2002) NJ

Publications

Journal Articles


  • Success Rates in Pediatric WPW Ablation Are Improved with 3-Dimensional Mapping Systems Compared with Fluoroscopy Alone: A Multicenter Study JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Ceresnak, S. R., Dubin, A. M., Kim, J. J., Valdes, S. O., Fishberger, S. B., Shetty, I., Zimmerman, F., Tanel, R. E., Epstein, M. R., Motonaga, K. S., Capone, C. A., Nappo, L., Gates, G. J., Pass, R. H. 2015; 26 (4): 412-416

    Abstract

    Three-dimensional mapping (3-D) systems are frequently used for ablation of supraventricular tachycardia. Prior studies have demonstrated radiation dosage reduction with 3-D, but there are no data on whether 3-D improves the efficacy of ablation of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). We sought to determine if 3-D improves the success rate for ablation of WPW in children.Multicenter retrospective study including patients ≤21 years of age with WPW undergoing ablation from 2008 to 2012. Success rates using the 2 techniques (3-D vs. fluoroscopy alone [FLUORO]) were compared.Six hundred and fifty-one cases were included (58% male, mean age 13 ± 4 years, 366 [56%] 3-D). Baseline characteristics including gender, weight, accessory pathway (AP) location, number of APs, and repeat ablation attempts were similar between the 2 groups (3-D and FLUORO) The 3-D group was slightly younger (12.7 ± 4.0 vs. 13.3 ± 4.0 years; P = 0.04) and less likely to undergo ablation utilizing cryoenergy (38 [10%] vs. 56 [20%]; P < 0.01). The 3-D group had a higher acute success rate of ablation (355 [97%] vs. 260 [91%]; P < 0.01). No differences were seen in recurrence (16 [5%] vs. 26 [9%]; P = 0.09) or complication rates (1 [0.3%] vs. 1 [0.4%]; P = 0.86) between the groups. On multivariable analysis, 3-D was shown to significantly improve success at ablation with an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% CI 1.44-6.72; P < 0.01).Use of 3-D significantly improved success rates for ablation of WPW in children. The increase in acute success associated with 3-D suggests it is an important adjunct for catheter ablation of WPW in children.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/jce.12623

    View details for Web of Science ID 000352814300012

    View details for PubMedID 25600208

  • Diminished exercise capacity and chronotropic incompetence in pediatric patients with congenital complete heart block and chronic right ventricular pacing. Heart rhythm Motonaga, K. S., Punn, R., Axelrod, D. M., Ceresnak, S. R., Hanisch, D., Kazmucha, J. A., Dubin, A. M. 2015; 12 (3): 560-565

    Abstract

    Chronic right ventricular (RV) pacing has been associated with decreased exercise capacity and left ventricular (LV) function in adults with congenital complete atrioventricular block (CCAVB), but not in children.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the exercise capacity and LV function in pediatric patients with CCAVB receiving chronic RV pacing.We prospectively evaluated pediatric patients with isolated CCAVB receiving atrial synchronous RV pacing for at least 5 years. Supine bicycle ergometry was performed, and LV ejection fraction (EF) was evaluated by echocardiography.Ten CCAVB subjects and 31 controls were matched for age, gender, and body surface area. CCAVB subjects had normal resting EF (63.1% ± 4.0%) and had been paced for 7.9 ± 1.4 years. Exercise testing demonstrated reduced functional capacity in CCAVB patients compared to controls with a lower VO2peak (26.0 ± 6.6 mL/kg/min vs 39.9 ± 7.0 mL/kg/min, P <.001), anaerobic threshold (15.6 ± 3.9 mL/kg/min vs 18.8 ± 2.7 mL/kg/min, P = .007), and oxygen uptake efficiency slope (1210 ± 406 vs 1841 ± 452, P <.001). Maximum heart rate (165 ± 8 bpm vs 185 ± 9 bpm, P <.001) and systolic blood pressure (159 ± 17 mm Hg vs 185 ± 12 mm Hg, P <.019) also were reduced in CCAVB patients despite maximal effort (respiratory exchange ratio 1.2 ± 0.1). EF was augmented with exercise in controls but not in CCAVB patients (13.2% ± 9.3% vs 0.2% ± 4.8% increase, P <.001).Clinically asymptomatic children with chronic RV pacing due to CCAVB have significant reductions in functional capacity accompanied by chronotropic incompetence and inability to augment EF with exercise.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.hrthm.2014.11.036

    View details for PubMedID 25433143

  • The Prevalence of Arrhythmias, Predictors for Arrhythmias, and Safety of Exercise Stress Testing in Children PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY Ghosh, R. M., Gates, G. J., Walsh, C. A., Schiller, M. S., Pass, R. H., Ceresnak, S. R. 2015; 36 (3): 584-590

    Abstract

    Exercise testing is commonly performed in children for evaluation of cardiac disease. Few data exist, however, on the prevalence, types of arrhythmias, predictors for arrhythmias, and safety of exercise testing in children. A retrospective review of all patients ≤21 years undergoing exercise testing at our center from 2008 to 2012 was performed. Patients with clinically relevant arrhythmias were compared to those not experiencing a significant arrhythmia. 1,037 tests were performed in 916 patients. The mean age was 14 ± 4 years, 537 (55 %) were male, 281 (27 %) had congenital heart disease, 178 (17 %) had a history of a prior arrhythmia, and 17 (2 %) had a pacemaker or ICD. 291 (28 %) patients had a rhythm disturbance during the procedure. Clinically important arrhythmias were noted in 34 (3 %) patients and included: 19 (1.8 %) increasing ectopy with exercise, 5 (0.5 %) VT, 5 (0.5 %) second degree AV block, 3 (0.3 %) SVT, and 2 (0.2 %) AFIB. On multivariate logistic regression, variables associated with the development of clinically relevant arrhythmias included severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction on echo (OR 1.99, CI 1.20-3.30) and prior history of a documented arrhythmia (OR 2.94, CI 1.25-6.88). There were no adverse events related to testing with no patient requiring cardioversion, defibrillation, or acute anti-arrhythmic therapy. A total of 28 % of children developed a rhythm disturbance during exercise testing and 3 % were clinically important. Severe LV dysfunction and a history of documented arrhythmia were associated with the development of a clinically important arrhythmia.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s00246-014-1053-9

    View details for Web of Science ID 000350034000019

    View details for PubMedID 25384613

  • Ventricular lead redundancy to prevent cardiovascular events and sudden death from lead fracture in pacemaker-dependent children. Heart rhythm Ceresnak, S. R., Perera, J. L., Motonaga, K. S., Avasarala, K., Malloy-Walton, L., Hanisch, D., Punn, R., Maeda, K., Reddy, V. M., Doan, L. N., Kirby, K., Dubin, A. M. 2015; 12 (1): 111-116

    Abstract

    Children requiring a permanent epicardial pacemaker(PM) traditionally have a single lead placed on the right ventricle. Lead failure in pacemaker dependent(PMD) children, however, can result in cardiovascular events(CVE) and death.To determine if redundant ventricular lead systems(RVLS) can safeguard against CVE and death in PMD children.Single-center study of PMD patients undergoing placement of RVLS from 2002-2013. Patients ≤ 21 years of age who were PMD were included. Patients with biventricular systems(BiV) systems placed for standard resynchronization indications were excluded. RVLS patients were compared to PMD patients with only a single pacing lead on the ventricle(SiV).769 patients underwent PM/ICD placement with 76 BiV implants and there were 49 PMD patients(6%). 13 patients underwent implantation of a RVLS. There was no difference between the RVLS group(n=13) and SiV PMD control group(n=24) with regard to age(RVLS 9.5±5.8 vs. SiV 9.4±6.7 years; p=0.52), weight(RVLS 38.2±32.6 vs. SiV 35.2±29.3 kg; p=0.62), indication for pacing, procedural complications or time to follow-up. There were 2 lead fractures (17%) in the RVLS group(mean follow-up 3.8±2.9 years) with no deaths or presentations with CVE. The SiV control group had 3 lead fractures (13%)(mean follow-up 2.8±2.9 years), with no deaths, but all 3 patients presented with CVE and required emergent PM placement.RVLS systems should be considered in children who are PMD and require permanent epicardial pacing. BiV pacing and RVLS may decrease the risk of CVEs in the event of lead failure in PMD patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.hrthm.2014.09.056

    View details for PubMedID 25277988

  • Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a child with Brugada pattern on ECG: One patient with two diseases? HEART RHYTHM Janson, C. M., Ceresnak, S. R., Chung, W. K., Pass, R. H. 2014; 11 (11): 2101-2104
  • Molecular diagnosis of long QT syndrome at 10 days of life by rapid whole genome sequencing HEART RHYTHM Priest, J. R., Ceresnak, S. R., Dewey, F. E., Malloy-Walton, L. E., Dunn, K., Grove, M. E., Perez, M. V., Maeda, K., Dubin, A. M., Ashley, E. A. 2014; 11 (10): 1707-1713
  • Effects of Ventilation and Catheter Position on Catheter Movement on the Tricuspid Annulus during Ablation in Children. Pacing and clinical electrophysiology : PACE Ceresnak, S. R., Kahana, M., Zucker, H. A., Mann, G., Nappo, L., Pass, R. H. 2014; 37 (8): 1051-1057

    Abstract

    There are little data on the effect of catheter position and mechanical ventilation on ablation catheter stability during electrophysiology study in children. We sought to determine the magnitude of catheter movement with mechanical ventilation, the effect of ventilation maneuvers on catheter movement, and to compare the degree of movement observed between the right lateral (RL) and right posteroseptal (RPS) regions.From June 2012 to June 2013, patients ≤21 years of age undergoing ablation for supraventricular tachycardia with CARTO® 3 (Biosense Webster, Diamond Bar, CA, USA) were included. During mapping the ablation catheter was placed in the RPS and RL regions and the magnitude of catheter movement (mm) was measured using CARTO® 3. Measurements were made during routine ventilation and with a maximal inspiration maneuver between end-expiration (ENDEX) and peak-inspiration (PEAKINS).Twenty-one patients were included: 12 males (57%), age 13 ± 3 years, weight 55 ± 14 kg. Indications for ablation were: 10 Wolff-Parkinson-White, seven atrioventricular node re-entry tachycardia, four concealed accessory pathway. Mechanical ventilation was used in all cases. The magnitude of catheter movement was 3.6 ± 1.7 mm with routine ventilation and 6.2 ± 4.1 mm between ENDEX and PEAKINS (P ≤ 0.01). Catheter movement was greater in the RL compared to the RPS region with routine ventilation (RL 4.3 ± 1.6 vs RPS 3.0 ± 1.5; P < 0.01) and between ENDEX and PEAKINS (RL 8.3 ± 4.7 vs RPS 4.0 ± 1.7; P < 0.01).Ventilation and catheter position both have significant impact on the degree of catheter movement during ablation. Movement was greatest in the RL position. This may partially explain the lower success rates of ablation in the RL region.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/pace.12393

    View details for PubMedID 24666025

  • Clinical and Electrophysiologic Characteristics of Antidromic Tachycardia in Children with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Ceresnak, S. R., Tanel, R. E., Pass, R. H., Liberman, L., Collins, K. K., Van Hare, G. F., Gates, G. J., Dubin, A. M. 2012; 35 (4): 480-488

    Abstract

    Antidromic reciprocating tachycardia (ART) is a rare form of wide complex tachycardia in children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). The incidence and electrophysiologic characteristics of ART in children with WPW have not been well described.A multicenter retrospective analysis of all patients with WPW undergoing electrophysiology (EP) study from 1990 to 2009 was performed. Patients with clinical or inducible ART were included.A total of 1,147 patients with WPW underwent EP study and 30 patients had ART (2.6%) and were the subject of this analysis. The mean age was 16±3 years, weight was 65±16 kg, and tachycardia cycle length was 305±55 ms. There were two patients (7%) with congenital heart disease (both with Ebstein's anomaly). Four patients (13%) had more than one accessory pathway (AP). The location of the AP was left sided in 53% of patients and right sided in 47%, with septal location and left lateral pathways most commonly involved. AP conduction was found to be high risk in 17 patients (57%). Ablation was not attempted in two patients (7%) due to proximity to the HIS and risk of heart block. Ablation was acutely successful in 93% of the patients in whom it was attempted.ART is a rare finding in children undergoing EP study. Over half of the patients with ART were found to be high risk and multiple AP were uncommon. Unlike the adult population, ART occurred commonly with septal APs.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1540-8159.2011.03317.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000302540300024

    View details for PubMedID 22324823

  • Are wide complex tachycardia algorithms applicable in children and patients with congenital heart disease? JOURNAL OF ELECTROCARDIOLOGY Ceresnak, S. R., Liberman, L., Avasarala, K., Tanel, R., Motonaga, K. S., Dubin, A. M. 2010; 43 (6): 694-700

    Abstract

    Several algorithms have been developed to help determine the etiology of wide complex tachycardias (WCTs) in adults. Sensitivity and specificity for differentiating supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) with aberration from ventricular tachycardia (VT) in adults have been demonstrated to be as high as 98% and 97%. These algorithms have not been tested in the pediatric population. We hypothesize that these algorithms have lower diagnostic accuracy in children and patients with congenital heart disease.A retrospective review of the pediatric electrophysiology database at Stanford from 2001 to 2008 was performed. All children with WCT, a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) available for review, and an electrophysiology study confirming the etiology of the rhythm were included. Patients with a paced rhythm were excluded. The ECGs were analyzed by 2 electrophysiologists blinded to the diagnosis according to the algorithms described in Brugada et al,(2) and Vereckei et al.(5) Additional ECG findings were recorded by each electrophysiologist.A total of 65 WCT ECGs in 58 patients were identified. Supraventricular tachycardia was noted in 62% (40/65) and VT in 38% (25/65) of the ECGs. The mean age was 13.5 years (SD ± 5.1), the mean weight was 51.8 kg (SD ± 22.4), and 48% (31/65) were male. The mean tachycardia cycle length was 340 milliseconds (SD ± 95). Congenital heart disease (CHD) was present in 37% (24/65) of patients (7 tetralogy of Fallot, 6 Ebstein's, 4 double-outlet right ventricle, 3 complex CHD, 2 d-transposition of great arteries, 1 status-post orthotopic heart transplantation, 1 ventricular septal defect). The Brugada algorithm correctly predicted the diagnosis 69% (45/65) of the time, the Vereckei algorithm correctly predicted the diagnosis 66% (43/65) of the time, and the blinded reviewer correctly predicted the diagnosis 78% (51/65) of the time. There was no difference in the efficacy of the algorithms in patients with CHD vs those with structurally normal hearts. The findings of left superior axis deviation (P < .01) and a notch in the QRS downstroke of V(1) or V(2) (P < .01) were more common in VT than SVT, whereas a positive QRS deflection in V(1) (P = .03) was more commonly present in SVT than VT.The Brugada and Vereckei algorithms have lower diagnostic accuracy in the pediatric population and in patients with congenital heart disease than in the adult population. Left superior axis deviation and a notch in the QRS downstroke were more commonly associated with VT, whereas a positive QRS deflection in V(1) was more commonly associated with SVT in this population.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jelectrocard.2010.02.008

    View details for Web of Science ID 000284514700039

    View details for PubMedID 20382398

  • Cryoablation with an 8-mm Tip Catheter for Pediatric Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia Is Safe and Efficacious with a Low Incidence of Recurrence PACE-PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY Silver, E. S., Silva, J. N., Ceresnak, S. R., Chiesa, N. A., Rhee, E. K., Dubin, A. M., Avasarala, K., Van Hare, G. F., Collins, K. K. 2010; 33 (6): 681-686

    Abstract

    Cryoablation with 4- and 6-mm tip ablation catheters has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in the treatment of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) in pediatric patients, albeit with a higher rate of clinical recurrence. Limited information is available regarding efficacy, mid-term outcomes, and complications related to the use of the 8-mm Freezor Max Cryoablation catheter (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) in pediatric patients.We performed a retrospective review of all pediatric patients with normal cardiac anatomy who underwent an ablation procedure for treatment of AVNRT using the 8-mm tip Cryoablation catheter at three large pediatric academic arrhythmia centers.Cryoablation with an 8-mm tip catheter was performed in 77 patients for treatment of AVNRT (female n = 40 [52%], age 14.8 +/- 2.2 years, weight 62.0 +/- 13.9 kg). Initial procedural success was achieved in 69 patients (69/76, 91%). Transient second- or third-degree atrioventricular (AV) block was noted in five patients (6.5%). There was no permanent AV block. Of the patients successfully ablated with Cryotherapy, there were two recurrences (2/70, 2.8%) over a follow-up of 11.6 +/- 3.3 months.Cryoablation with an 8-mm tip ablation catheter is both safe and effective with a low risk of recurrence for the treatment of AVNRT in pediatric patients.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1540-8159.2010.02706.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000278818200006

    View details for PubMedID 20230479

  • An epicardial pacing safety net: an alternative technique for pacing in the young CARDIOLOGY IN THE YOUNG Ceresnak, S. R., Liberman, L., Chen, J. M., Hordof, A. J., Lamberti, J. J., Bonney, W. J., Pass, R. H. 2009; 19 (3): 228-232

    Abstract

    Epicardial pacing is the standard approach for permanent pacing in small children and patients with functionally univentricular physiology. The longevity of epicardial leads, however, is compromised by increased occurrences of exit block and lead fractures. We report our experience with a technique of placing a second ventricular lead, and attaching it to the atrial port of a dual chamber pacemaker to prevent the need for early re-operation in the event of failure of the primary epicardial lead. A retrospective review showed that, over the period from 2001 through 2007, epicardial ventricular pacemakers had been placed in 88 patients. In 6 of these, we had placed 2 ventricular leads, their median weight being 8.0 kilograms, with a range from 4.2 to 31.8 kilograms. Fracture of a lead occurred in 1 of the patients (17%) 8 months after placement, requiring reprogramming to pace from the atrial port. This possibility avoided the need for repeated emergent surgery. At a median follow-up of 1.5 years, with a range from 0.3 to 4.4 years, there have been no complications. During the same time period, overall failure of epicardial leads at our institution was 13%. Placement of a second ventricular epicardial pacing lead, attached to the atrial port of a dual chamber pacemaker, therefore, may provide a safe and effective means of ventricular pacing in the setting of epicardial lead failure, and may obviate the need for repeat, potentially urgent, pacemaker surgery.

    View details for DOI 10.1017/S1047951109003710

    View details for Web of Science ID 000266792000003

    View details for PubMedID 19272204

  • Coronary Artery Fistulas: A Review of the Literature and Presentation of Two Cases of Coronary Fistulas with Drainage into the Left Atrium Congenital Heart Disease Ceresnak, MD, S. R., Gray, MD, R. G., Altmann, MD, K., Chen, MD, J. M., Glickstein, MD, J. S., Hellenbrand, MD, W. E. 2007; 2 (3): 208-213

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