Bio

Bio


Dr. Lin is an expert clinician, educator, and researcher in the specialty of family medicine. He earned his MD from Stanford University School of Medicine and completed his medical training at Stanford’s family medicine residency program at O’Connor Hospital. Dr. Lin is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and is an active member of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. He has received numerous national awards and is recognized among the top family physicians in the United States.

Dr. Lin cares for people of all ages, often for members of the same family. He has a particular interest in preventive cardiology, diabetes, hepatitis B, and mental health. He is proficient in a wide range of primary care procedures – including over forty different skin, musculoskeletal, and women’s health procedures that are performed in the office. Dr. Lin is fluent in Mandarin Chinese and provides the highest quality, evidence based, culturally competent care to people of all backgrounds.

Dr. Lin is the medical director of Stanford Family Medicine and the associate section chief for medical education in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health. He loves to teach, do research, and design innovative medical education programs. Dr. Lin is the founder of the nationally recognized O’Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Program, and the co-founder of the Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD). His research spans a broad spectrum of primary care topics. Dr. Lin is the author of over 150 scholarly works and presentations.

Clinical Focus


  • Family Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Stanford Family Medicine (2016 - Present)
  • Associate Section Chief for Medical Education, Division of Primary Care and Population Health (2016 - Present)
  • Director of Research and Innovation, O'Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Program (2015 - Present)
  • Founder and Co-Director, MD Program Early Matriculation Bootcamp (2015 - 2016)
  • Founder and Co-Director, Family Medicine Minor Procedure Service (2015 - Present)
  • Founder and Director, Clinical Observation and Medical Transcription (COMET) Fellowship (2015 - Present)
  • Founder and Co-Director, Interprofessional Management of Population Health with Advanced Computer Technology (IMPACT) Program (2015 - 2016)
  • Co-Founder and Director of Program Development, Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive (SHIELD) (2014 - Present)
  • Co-Medical Director, Arbor Free Clinic (2013 - 2016)
  • Co-Director, Patient Partners Program (2013 - 2015)
  • Associate, Educators-4-CARE (E4C) Program (2011 - 2015)
  • Founder and Director, O'Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Program (2010 - 2015)

Honors & Awards


  • Clinician Educator Research Award, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine (2016)
  • New Faculty Scholar Award, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2016)
  • Pisacano Leadership Foundation Alumni Award, American Board of Family Medicine (2015)
  • The Arthur L. Bloomfield Award in Recognition of Excellence in the Teaching of Clinical Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine (2015)
  • Faculty for Tomorrow Task Force Member, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2015-2017)
  • Preceptor of the Year, California Academy of Family Physicians Foundation (2015)
  • Clinician Educator Research Award, Division of General Medical Disciplines, Stanford University School of Medicine (2014)
  • Year of the Family Physician Member Spotlight, California Academy of Family Physicians (2014)
  • Citation in National Hepatitis B Screening Recommendations, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2014)
  • National Innovative Program Award, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2014)
  • William C. Fowkes, Jr., MD Teaching Award, O'Connor Hospital, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2013)
  • Award for Excellence in Graduate Medical Education, American Academy of Family Physicians (2012)
  • Citation in National Viral Hepatitis Action Plan, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2011)
  • Citation in National Report on Hepatitis and Liver Cancer, Institute of Medicine (2010)
  • Pisacano Scholar, The Pisacano Leadership Foundation, American Board of Family Medicine (2009)
  • Community Outreach Award, American Academy of Family Physicians (2008)
  • Angels in Medicine Award, Angels in Medicine (2008)
  • Vera Moulton Wall Center Award in Arts, Humanities and Medicine, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics (2008)
  • Schweitzer Fellow, The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (2007)
  • William J. Griffith University Service Award, Duke University (2006)
  • Rainbow of Heroes Award, Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation Program, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center (2005)
  • Serena WuDunn Memorial Scholar, Duke University (2005)
  • Phi Beta Kappa, Duke University (2004)
  • Howard Hughes Research Fellow, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (2004)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Diplomate, American Board of Family Medicine (2013 - Present)
  • Member, American Academy of Family Physicians (2010 - Present)
  • Member, California Academy of Family Physicians (2010 - Present)
  • Member, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (2010 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Family Medicine, American Board of Family Medicine (2013)
  • Residency:O'Connor Hospital (2013) CA
  • Internship:O'Connor Hospital (2011) CA
  • Medical Education:Stanford University (2010) CA
  • Bachelor of Science, Duke University, NC (2006)

Community and International Work


  • Asian Liver Center

    Topic

    Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer

    Populations Served

    Public

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • Cardinal Free Clinics

    Topic

    Health Care Safety Net

    Populations Served

    Underserved Populations

    Location

    Bay Area

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

  • COMET

    Topic

    Medical Scribe Fellowship

    Populations Served

    Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Students

    Location

    California

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Primary care and population health
Value added medical education
Healthcare technology

Projects


  • Designing and testing an academic bonus calculator for clinician educators

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Identifying opportunities to enhance live nurse triage in primary care with machine learning

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Feasibility and effectiveness of tele-PT for improving pain management

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Identifying automation opportunities for improving quality and efficiency of scribing

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Designing the new continuity of care clerkship: applying lean methodology to curriculum quality improvement

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Evaluation of a live workshop for family medicine residents to increase interest in academics as a career choice

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Pilot study of a smartphone app to improve patient referral services at the Cardinal Free Clinics

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Patient perceptions of lab follow-up at the Cardinal Free Clinics

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • MD student education in laboratory medicine at Arbor Free Clinic

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Impact of medical scribes on physician-patient interaction, satisfaction, productivity, and education in a family medicine clinic: the first randomized controlled study

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Interprofessional management of population health with advanced computer technology (IMPACT): a value added medical education pilot

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • A 12-hour skills-building bootcamp to prepare students for early clinical experiences

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Effect of priming using photographs on patient-centered communication by medical students: a randomized controlled study

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • Just in time education tools: creating the Family Medicine Computer Assisted Simulations for Educating Students (fmCASES) smartphone app

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

  • A multi‐year study to measure the effectiveness and impact of the O’Connor‐Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) Program

    Location

    Stanford University School of Medicine

Teaching

2016-17 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Qualities of Resident Teachers Valued by Medical Students FAMILY MEDICINE Montacute, T., Teng, V. C., Yu, G. C., Schillinger, E., Lin, S. 2016; 48 (5): 381-384

    Abstract

    Medical students often see residents as the most important teachers on the wards. However, there is a relative lack of data on the qualities that medical students value in their resident teachers. We conducted a qualitative study to determine the teaching behaviors that medical students value in their resident teachers.Over a 1-year period, 28 medical students completed 115 open-ended written reflections about their educational experiences with residents at a single, university-affiliated, community-based family medicine residency program in San Jose, CA. Qualitative data were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with grounded theory. Ten recurring themes were identified after triangulation with published literature.When given the opportunity to make open-ended written reflections about the teaching abilities of their resident teachers, medical students most often commented on topics relevant to a "safe learning environment." More than one in four reflections were associated with this theme, and all were characterized as positive, suggesting that the ability to set a safe learning environment is a quality that medical students value in their resident teachers. In contrast, the least frequently occurring theme was "knowledge," suggesting that residents' fund of knowledge may not be as important as other qualities in the eyes of medical students.Our study adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that, from the medical students' perspective, a resident's fund of medical knowledge may not be as important as his/her ability to establish a supportive, safe, and nonthreatening environment to learn and practice medicine.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000376224100009

    View details for PubMedID 27159098

  • Training Future Clinician-Educators: A Track for Family Medicine Residents. Family medicine Lin, S., Sattler, A., Chen Yu, G., Basaviah, P., Schillinger, E. 2016; 48 (3): 212-216

    Abstract

    Despite a growing demand for skilled clinician-educators, residents today rarely receive formal training in clinical teaching, curriculum development, administration, leadership, or educational scholarship. The authors describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of the O'Connor Stanford Leaders in Education Residency (OSLER) track, a novel clinician-educator track within the family medicine residency program affiliated with Stanford University School of Medicine.In 2010, the OSLER track was introduced at O'Connor Hospital, a community hospital that houses an 8-8-8 family medicine residency program. Residents who are in good standing can apply to the track at the midpoint of their first postgraduate year. Residents are immersed in a flexible, experience-based, 2.5-year-long curriculum with hands-on teaching activities at its core. To foster skills in educational scholarship, track residents are required to design and complete a scholarly project.A comprehensive evaluation plan is currently in progress. Preliminary data indicates high levels of satisfaction with the track's overall value, impact on core teaching skills, and effect on career trajectory. Residents gained more confidence in core teaching skills as they progressed through the track. Scholarly work output by residents has increased significantly since the track was implemented. The residency program has seen an increased interest from applicants since the track was started, with data suggesting that applicant quality has increased from the pre-track to post-track years.More research is needed to assess the effectiveness and reproducibility of this clinician-educator track. If proven, this model may be replicated at other academic medical centers.

    View details for PubMedID 26950910

  • Impact of a scholarly track on quality of residency program applicants. Education for primary care : an official publication of the Association of Course Organisers, National Association of GP Tutors, World Organisation of Family Doctors Celebi, J. M., Nguyen, C. T., Sattler, A. L., Stevens, M. B., Lin, S. Y. 2016: 1-4

    Abstract

    It is generally believed that residency programs offering scholarly tracks attract higher quality applicants, although there is little evidence of this in the literature. We explored the impact of a clinician-educator track on the quality of applicants to our residency program by comparing the volume and characteristics of applicants before (2008-2011) and after (2012-2015) the track was introduced.The total number of applications received was compared between the pre-track and post-track years. Among interviewees, data on United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores, Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores, Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) scores, and proportion of candidates with an advanced degree (e.g. MPH, PhD) were compared. An online survey was administered to all interviewees in 2014-2015 to measure interest in the track.The total number of applications to the residency program increased significantly from the pre-track to the post-track years. Compared to the pre-track years, interviewees during the post-track years had statistically higher USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores, better MSPE scores, and were more likely to have an advanced degree. Two-thirds of survey respondents reported that the track increased their interest in the residency program.A residency clinician-educator track may be associated with increased overall interest from applicants, higher application volume, and better measures of applicant quality based on USMLE scores, MSPE scores, and proportion of candidates with an advanced degree. Residency programs may consider a potential increase in the quality of their applicants as an added benefit of offering a scholarly track.

    View details for DOI 10.1080/14739879.2016.1197049

    View details for PubMedID 27312956

  • Codes and Pheos. Journal of general internal medicine Lin, S. 2016

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11606-016-3639-9

    View details for PubMedID 26941043

  • Next big thing: integrating medical scribes into academic medical centres BMJ STEL Lin, S., Khoo, J., Schillinger, E. 2016; 2: 27-29
  • Hepatitis B Screening in Asian and Pacific Islanders: New Guidelines, Old Barriers JOURNAL OF IMMIGRANT AND MINORITY HEALTH Nguyen, C. T., Lin, S. Y. 2015; 17 (5): 1585-1587

    Abstract

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious liver disease that disproportionately affects Asian and Pacific Islander immigrants. In May 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released new HBV screening guidelines that expanded screening to non-pregnant adolescents and adults who were born in Asia and the Pacific Islands, and U.S.-born persons not vaccinated as infants whose parents were born in Central or Southeast Asia. Although the guidelines empower health care providers and community health workers to expand their screening efforts, old barriers to screening remain deeply rooted in this population. These barriers include cultural beliefs about wellness, myths and misconceptions about HBV, and lack of access to appropriate, culturally sensitive care. Through a combination of strategies-retooling the current health care workforce to be more culturally sensitive providers, involving oriental medicine practitioners in patient education, and engaging grassroots organizations-we can overcome barriers and take full advantage of the new HBV screening guidelines.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10903-014-0123-7

    View details for Web of Science ID 000360911300036

    View details for PubMedID 25354568

  • Value-added medical education: engaging future doctors to transform health care delivery today. Journal of general internal medicine Lin, S. Y., Schillinger, E., Irby, D. M. 2015; 30 (2): 150-151

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11606-014-3018-3

    View details for PubMedID 25217209

  • Documentation and treatment of hypertension: quality of care and missed opportunities in a family medicine resident clinic. Postgraduate medical journal So, P., Lin, S. Y. 2015; 91 (1071): 30-34

    Abstract

    In the USA, uncontrolled hypertension contributes to 1000 deaths a day. However, little is known about the quality of hypertension management in family medicine resident clinics.To examine rates of documentation and treatment of elevated blood pressure, and to identify missed opportunities to address hypertension. Study design A cross-sectional chart review of 1011 adult patient visits between 2 January and 4 February 2013 was performed in a resident-run federally qualified health centre. For patients with elevated blood pressure at time of visit, we noted whether or not the residents had documented a diagnosis or discussion of hypertension and the presence or absence of a treatment plan. We compared these rates with those from a national sample of primary care physicians.262/1011 (26%) of adult patients had elevated blood pressure at time of visit. Of those, 115/262 (44%) had documentation and a plan for treatment, 79/262 (30%) had documentation but no plan, and 68/262 (26%) had neither documentation nor plan. Nationally, 45% of patients are diagnosed and treated compared with 44% of study visits with documentation and treatment.Fewer than half of visits of patients with elevated blood pressure resulted in both documentation and a treatment plan. Nevertheless, these rates are comparable to national providers. Elevated blood pressure was more likely to be missed during acute visits and in patients with less elevated blood pressure.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/postgradmedj-2013-132520

    View details for PubMedID 25583737

  • Always Learning: Why I Build Smartphone Apps California Family Physician Lin, S. 2015; 66 (2): 24,26
  • Effectiveness of a Smartphone App for Guiding Antidepressant Drug Selection FAMILY MEDICINE Man, C., Cathina Nguyen, C., Lin, S. 2014; 46 (8): 626-630

    Abstract

    Major depression is a prevalent chronic disease in the United States. However, many physicians lack access to decision support tools at point of care to help choose antidepressants in a rational, evidence-based manner. A patient-centered treatment model that uses a symptom-based approach to selecting antidepressants was developed into a smartphone application to provide instant, evidence-based recommendations and drug monographs. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of this mobile application on the confidence level of family physicians in treating depression.The smartphone application was provided to 14 family medicine residents and attending physicians from the O'Connor Family Medicine Residency Program in San Jose, CA. Participants were asked to use the software as drug reference and clinical decision support during patient care activities. Three surveys were administered over a 12-week period to assess provider characteristics, outcome measures (ie, confidence in managing depression and choosing an initial antidepressant based on patient symptoms, medical comorbidities, potential side effects, and drug interactions), and fund of antidepressant knowledge.The average confidence levels in managing depression, starting an antidepressant on a patient with depression, and choosing an initial antidepressant based on patient symptoms increased significantly within the period of smartphone application usage. The average scores on the antidepressant knowledge tests also improved.The smartphone application was an effective tool for both increasing confidence in depression treatment and educating physicians. Future studies to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of smartphone applications on medical education and postgraduate training are warranted.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000341557200008

  • The Symptom Cluster-Based Approach to Individualize Patient-Centered Treatment for Major Depression JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF FAMILY MEDICINE Lin, S. Y., Stevens, M. B. 2014; 27 (1): 151-159

    Abstract

    Unipolar major depressive disorder is a common, disabling, and costly disease that is the leading cause of ill health, early death, and suicide in the United States. Primary care doctors, in particular family physicians, are the first responders in this silent epidemic. Although more than a dozen different antidepressants in 7 distinct classes are widely used to treat depression in primary care, there is no evidence that one drug is superior to another. Comparative effectiveness studies have produced mixed results, and no specialty organization has published recommendations on how to choose antidepressants in a rational, evidence-based manner. In this article we present the theory and evidence for an individualized, patient-centered treatment model for major depression designed around a targeted symptom cluster-based approach to antidepressant selection. When using this model for healthy adults with major depressive disorder, the choice of antidepressants should be guided by the presence of 1 of 4 common symptom clusters: anxiety, fatigue, insomnia, and pain. This model was built to foster future research, provide a logical framework for teaching residents how to select antidepressants, and equip primary care doctors with a structured treatment strategy to deliver optimal patient-centered care in the management of a debilitating disease: major depressive disorder.

    View details for DOI 10.3122/jabfm.2014.01.130145

    View details for Web of Science ID 000329292000021

    View details for PubMedID 24390897

  • Renewing US medical students' interest in primary care: bridging the role model gap POSTGRADUATE MEDICAL JOURNAL Teng, V. C., Lin, S. Y. 2014; 90 (1059): 1-2
  • Stopping a Silent Killer in the Underserved Asian and Pacific Islander Community: A Chronic Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer Prevention Clinic by Medical Students ASIAN PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CANCER PREVENTION Lin, S. Y., Chang, E. T., So, S. K. 2009; 10 (3): 383-386

    Abstract

    To assess and alleviate the burden of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among low-income, uninsured Asian and Pacific Islanders (APIs) in San Jose, California.From 2007 to 2008, we provided free HBV testing and follow-up to 510 patients, 74% of whom were foreign-born Vietnamese. Patients were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and surface antibody. Chronically infected patients who elected to undergo follow-up monitoring were evaluated for liver damage (ALT), liver cancer (AFP), and HBV replication (HBV DNA).Overall, 17% were chronically infected; 33% of these were unaware that they were infected. Of those who underwent follow-up monitoring, 100% had elevated ALT, 9% had elevated AFP, and 24% had HBV DNA levels that exceeded the threshold for treatment. Patients who were candidates for antiviral therapy were enrolled in drug assistance programs, and those with elevated AFP levels were referred for CT scans. Uninfected patients lacking protective antibodies were provided free HBV vaccinations.More liver cancer prevention in the medically underserved API community is needed, including universal screening for HBV and follow-up for those chronically infected.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000270750100011

    View details for PubMedID 19640178

  • Building partnerships with Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners to increase hepatitis B awareness and prevention JOURNAL OF ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE Chang, E. T., Lin, S. Y., Sue, E., Bergin, M., Su, J., So, S. K. 2007; 13 (10): 1125-1127

    Abstract

    The annual Hepatitis B Prevention and Education Symposium aims to develop partnerships between non-Western and Western health care providers to prevent chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and death from liver cancer among Asians and Pacific Islanders (APIs).Each year from 2004 through 2007, we partnered with professional, academic, and community-based organizations to organize an educational symposium for Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners and acupuncturists in California. Participants completed pre- and postsymposium surveys assessing knowledge about HBV and liver cancer.The symposia were held in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Stanford, California.Over 1000 participants attended the four symposia combined; most were born in Asia.Symposium activities included educational lectures and games, presentation of a physician's guide to HBV management, and case studies.Chi-square tests were used to compare the proportion of correct responses to each knowledge-based question, as well as the total number of correct responses, before and after the symposium.Knowledge about HBV and liver cancer was low prior to the symposium. The proportion of correct responses to the most commonly mistaken questions increased significantly at the conclusion of each symposium. The total number of correct responses rose from below 60% to above 75% each year.Similar educational symposia targeting health care providers who serve API patients can improve HBV and liver cancer awareness and prevention throughout the API community.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/acm.2007.0655

    View details for Web of Science ID 000252247200014

    View details for PubMedID 18166125

  • Why we should routinely screen Asian American adults for hepatitis B: A cross-sectional study of Asians in California HEPATOLOGY Lin, S. Y., Chang, E. T., So, S. K. 2007; 46 (4): 1034-1040

    Abstract

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious liver disease that, if left undiagnosed or without appropriate medical management, is associated with a 25% chance of death from cirrhosis or liver cancer. To study the demographics and prevalence of chronic HBV infection and HBV vaccination in the Asian American population, we provided free HBV serological screening and administered a survey to 3163 Asian American adult volunteers in the San Francisco Bay Area between 2001 and 2006. Of those screened, 8.9% were chronically infected with HBV. Notably, one-half to two-thirds (65.4%) of the chronically infected adults were unaware that they were infected. Of those who were not chronically infected, 44.8% lacked protective antibodies against HBV and were likely susceptible to future infection. Men were twice as likely as women to be chronically infected (12.1% versus 6.4%). Asian Americans born in East Asia, Southeast Asia, or the Pacific Islands were 19.4 times more likely to be chronically infected than those born in the United States. Self-reporting of prior vaccination was unreliable to assess protection against HBV. Among the 12% who reported having been vaccinated, 5.2% were chronically infected, and 20.3% lacked protective antibodies.Given the high prevalence of unrecognized chronic HBV infection in the Asian American population, we call for healthcare providers to routinely screen Asian adults for HBV, regardless of their vaccination status. Those who test positive should be provided with culturally appropriate information to prevent disease transmission and proper medical management to reduce their risk of liver disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/hep.21784

    View details for Web of Science ID 000249910500013

    View details for PubMedID 17654490

  • Hepatitis B and liver cancer knowledge and preventive practices among Asian Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area, California ASIAN PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CANCER PREVENTION Wu, C. A., Lin, S. Y., So, S. K., Chang, E. T. 2007; 8 (1): 127-134

    Abstract

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection causes liver cancer and disproportionately affects the Asian community in the U.S. In order to advance HBV and liver cancer awareness and prevention, it is important to identify existing gaps in knowledge and preventive practices among Asian Americans. Therefore, the authors administered a written questionnaire to 199 adults in the Asian-American community of the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Although the majority of adults had at least a college education, knowledge regarding HBV transmission, prevention, symptoms, risks, and occurrence was low. Fewer than 60% reported having been tested for HBV, only 31% reported having been vaccinated against HBV, and only 44% reported having had their children vaccinated. Asians, especially those born in China or Southeast Asia, had significantly poorer knowledge regarding HBV and liver cancer than non-Asians. Those with higher knowledge levels were significantly more likely to have been tested for HBV and to have had their children vaccinated. Younger adults, women, Caucasians, more highly educated individuals, those not born in China or Hong Kong, and those with a personal or family history of liver disease were more likely to have taken preventive action against HBV. Our results suggest that HBV and liver cancer knowledge among Asian Americans, especially Chinese Americans, is poor, and that better knowledge is associated with increased preventive practices. Thus, there is a need for increased HBV education and improved community-based interventions to prevent HBV-related liver disease in the high-risk Asian-American community.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000253887000026

    View details for PubMedID 17477787