Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Hospital Medicine
  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Medical Director, Performance Improvement, Stanford Children's Health (2012 - Present)
  • Fellowship Director, Stanford University Clinical Excellence Research Center (2011 - Present)
  • Associate Medical Director, Acute Care, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford (2014 - Present)
  • Physician Lead, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Performance Improvement (2010 - 2012)

Honors & Awards


  • Faculty Teaching Honor Roll with Letter of Teaching Distinction, Faculty Teaching Honor Roll with Letter of Teaching Distinction (2013)
  • Faculty Teaching Honor Roll with Letter of Teaching Distinction, Stanford University School of Medicine (2012)
  • Faculty Teaching Honor Roll, Stanford University School of Medicine (2011)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Fellow, American Academy of Pediatrics (2011 - Present)
  • Fellow, American College of Physicians (2011 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Residency:University of Michigan Health System (2010) MI
  • Residency:University of Michigan Health System (2009) MI
  • Internship:University of Michigan Health System (2006) MI
  • Medical Education:University of Michigan (2005) MI
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2009)
  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2009)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Research interest focuses on improving clinical processes using a "Lean" business strategy and engaging clinicains in systems based clinical improvement efforts.

Teaching

Stanford Advisees


Publications

All Publications


  • Better health, less spending: Redesigning the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare for youth with chronic illness. Healthcare (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Vaks, Y., Bensen, R., Steidtmann, D., Wang, T. D., Platchek, T. S., Zulman, D. M., Malcolm, E., Milstein, A. 2016; 4 (1): 57-68

    Abstract

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with serious chronic illnesses face costly and dangerous gaps in care as they transition from pediatric to adult health systems. New, financially sustainable approaches to transition are needed to close these gaps. We designed a new transition model for adolescents and young adults with a variety of serious chronic conditions. Our explicit goal was to build a model that would improve the value of care for youth 15-25 years of age undergoing this transition. The design process incorporated a review, analysis, and synthesis of relevant clinical and health services research; stakeholder interviews; and observations of high-performing healthcare systems. We identified three major categories of solutions for a safer and lower cost transition to adult care: (1) building and supporting self-management during the critical transition; (2) engaging receiving care; and (3) providing checklist-driven guide services during the transition. We propose that implementation of a program with these interventions would have a positive impact on all three domains of the triple aim - improving health, improving the experience of care, and reducing per capita healthcare cost. The transition model provides a general framework as well as suggestions for specific interventions. Pilot tests to assess the model's ease of implementation, clinical effects, and financial impact are currently underway.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.hjdsi.2015.09.001

    View details for PubMedID 27001100

  • Time-driven activity-based costing of multivessel coronary artery bypass grafting across national boundaries to identify improvement opportunities: study protocol. BMJ open Erhun, F., Mistry, B., Platchek, T., Milstein, A., Narayanan, V. G., Kaplan, R. S. 2015; 5 (8)

    Abstract

    Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is a well-established, commonly performed treatment for coronary artery disease--a disease that affects over 10% of US adults and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In 2005, the mean cost for a CABG procedure among Medicare beneficiaries in the USA was $32, 201 ± $23,059. The same operation reportedly costs less than $2000 to produce in India. The goals of the proposed study are to (1) identify the difference in the costs incurred to perform CABG surgery by three Joint Commission accredited hospitals with reputations for high quality and efficiency and (2) characterise the opportunity to reduce the cost of performing CABG surgery.We use time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to quantify the hospitals' costs of producing elective, multivessel CABG. TDABC estimates the costs of a given clinical service by combining information about the process of patient care delivery (specifically, the time and quantity of labour and non-labour resources utilised to perform each activity) with the unit cost of each resource used to provide the care. Resource utilisation was estimated by constructing CABG process maps for each site based on observation of care and staff interviews. Unit costs were calculated as a capacity cost rate, measured as a $/min, for each resource consumed in CABG production. Multiplying together the unit costs and resource quantities and summing across all resources used will produce the average cost of CABG production at each site. We will conclude by conducting a variance analysis of labour costs to reveal opportunities to bend the cost curve for CABG production in the USA.All our methods were exempted from review by the Stanford Institutional Review Board. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific meetings.

    View details for DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008765

    View details for PubMedID 26307621

  • Implementation of Data Drive Heart Rate and Respiratory Rate parameters on a Pediatric Acute Care Unit. Studies in health technology and informatics Goel, V., Poole, S., Kipps, A., Palma, J., Platchek, T., Pageler, N., Longhurst, C., Sharek, P. 2015; 216: 918-?

    Abstract

    The majority of hospital physiologic monitor alarms are not clinically actionable and contribute to alarm fatigue. In 2014, The Joint Commission declared alarm safety as a National Patient Safety Goal and urged prompt action by hospitals to mitigate the issue [1]. It has been demonstrated that vital signs in hospitalized children are quite different from currently accepted reference ranges [2]. Implementation of data-driven, age stratified vital sign parameters (Table 1) for alarms in this patient population could reduce alarm frequency.

    View details for PubMedID 26262220

  • Better Health, Less Spending Delivery Innovation for Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease STROKE Kalanithi, L., Tai, W., Conley, J., Platchek, T., Zulman, D., Milstein, A. 2014; 45 (10): 3105-?

    View details for DOI 10.1161/STROKEAHA.114.006236

    View details for Web of Science ID 000342794700056

    View details for PubMedID 25123221

  • Better Health, Less Spending: Stanford University’s Clinical Excellence Research Center Health Management, Policy and Innovation Platchek, T., Rebitzer, R., Zulman, D., Milstein, A. 2014; 2 (1): 10-17
  • Lean Health Care for the Hospitalist Hospital Medicine Clinics Platchek, T., Kim, C. 2012; 1 (1): e148-160